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Cultured Vegetables  This thread currently has 15,757 views. Print Print Thread
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TJ
Saturday, August 13, 2011, 8:29pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I don't know where I stand with ginger.  It's good for me, so that's a plus.  But it's also a very strange taste that I haven't figured out how to make use of in my cooking.
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Chloe
Saturday, August 13, 2011, 9:24pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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My weird mixture of cucumbers, radishes, apples, ginger, garlic, cilantro came out delicious!  It
was just a little over 2 days fermenting and although I'm leaving the jars out for one more, I was able to eat some of it for lunch mixed into sardines... Normally ginger gives me reflux and garlic makes me burp....but once fermented, all of the ingredients sat well in my gut.

It's amazing that you can culture almost anything....Oh, BTW, I added a Polyflora A to this batch.
i like personalizing the bacteria I'm eating.


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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Drea
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 12:59am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I bought a bunch of cilantro, thinking I was going to make a jicama salad, but then the Internet went down and I couldn't look up the recipe. Instead, I made three more batches of fermented veggies:

  • red beets and ginger
  • jicama and ginger
  • jicama and carrots


All three are doing fine, though I have to say, my favorite is still turnips, ginger, and garlic!

I'm also going to try some brocolli slaw-kraut, on Mayflowers' recommendation!


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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passionprincess
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 1:27am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I swear... you and your love for ginger and garlic! Koreans would love you for that. I always found the scent and taste too strong so I avoided certain Korean foods or washed my kimchee in water as a child. Even today, my kimchee is considered very mild. I run my garlic through the food processor and puree it so I would not get chunks in my kimchee.

Quoted from Drea
I bought a bunch of cilantro, thinking I was going to make a jicama salad, but then the Internet went down and I couldn't look up the recipe. Instead, I made three more batches of fermented veggies:

  • red beets and ginger
  • jicama and ginger
  • jicama and carrots


All three are doing fine, though I have to say, my favorite is still turnips, ginger, and garlic!

I'm also going to try some brocolli slaw-kraut, on Mayflowers' recommendation!




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JJR
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 3:24am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ginger is God's gift to man.  Well, at least to me.  It really helps my stomach.  Ginger to, but it's different.  But yes, I've eaten garlic raw too.  I prefer ginger raw though.


The poster formerly known as "ABNOWAY"

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honeybee
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 3:29am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Yeah I don't usually have a prob with ginger, at all. In fact it is my go-to when I am nauseous. However when I threw up for a few hours at sea on a boat - even ginger didn't help
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Drea
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 3:32am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sometimes, if you wait until you are already nauseous, it takes longer to kick in (the ginger, that is). I used to suck on raw ginger root whenever I went sailing, whether I felt sick or not, just to be sure.


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Drea
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 4:47am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Drea
I just made another batch of cultured veggies and didn't do what I said I was going to...instead, I sliced, julienned, and shredded three red/white beets, sliced and shredded a large ginger root, and added two capsules of Polyflora A along with sea salt.


So I just tasted the beets and they are very close to tasting like canned sauerkraut! The jicama isn't near as far along in the fermented process, and the only difference besides the vegetables used, is the polyflora A. Hmmm.



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passionprincess
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 4:52am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Polyflora has bacteria that will encourage fermentation. I use a bit of milk kefir+rice flour (instead of water and rice flour) to give it a boost. However, keep in mind that your fermentation will take place quicker because of the additional bacteria.

As long as you know how to control it, you will be fine.


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Mayflowers
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 12:26pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Drea


So I just tasted the beets and they are very close to tasting like canned sauerkraut! The jicama isn't near as far along in the fermented process, and the only difference besides the vegetables used, is the polyflora A. Hmmm.



Do you think the Polyflora A caused the fermintation to not be balanced?
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Drea
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 1:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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It was balanced (and tasted great, btw), it just took a lot less time than the jars I made without it. Also, I used two polyflora A capsules for the one jar of beets/ginger, so next time I'll use only one. The other thing the polyflora A did was to make the batch bubble over into the bowl I had the jar sitting in, several times per day, which left the top veggies unprotected. They weren't moldy, but weren't the nice red color the submerged veggies are (more brown, though they tasted okay).

I know folks say this all the time, but the only way to really find out how something is going to work in your own environment is to experiment! I'm like you Mayflowers, I like to gather all the information beforehand, then attempt the project. With the water kefir, and more so the kombucha, I just winged it, and was pleasantly surprised at the awesome outcome!


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passionprincess
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 1:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Polyflora will make it ferment faster as Drea mentioned. My fear is that the veggies will get too sour and soft to eat.

Cabbage kimchee requires a "rice porridge" which is sweet rice and water mix. That is basically a starter for fermentation. I use milk kefir whey and brown rice flour. So it is similar to adding a Polyflora except brown rice takes a bit longer to ferment.


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Drea
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 1:30pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from passionprincess
Polyflora will make it ferment faster as Drea mentioned. My fear is that the veggies will get too sour and soft to eat.


passionprincess, yes! That's exactly what happened...the beet/ginger mix is very soft and sour (though I love sour). I prefer my fermented veggies to retain a slight crunch, which is usually why I like to thinly slice versus shred the veggies...but I was experimenting! I'll eat the beet/ginger mix anyway, but know I probably won't make it again with the polyflora A...the jicama, on the other hand, is sliced, but almost too crunchy. I may have to leave that one sitting out longer...


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passionprincess
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 1:38pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Basing the jicama on daikon radish, it might take a few days to up to a week. Once radish/root veggies are fermented properly, it is much more delicious than greens! IMHO.

If it gets too tangy, add some eggs and fry it up or throw in some meat or fish.

Your veggies sound soo good! I am brining my "Mexican" mix and will finish it after my nap.

Quoted from Drea


passionprincess, yes! That's exactly what happened...the beet/ginger mix is very soft and sour (though I love sour). I prefer my fermented veggies to retain a slight crunch, which is usually why I like to thinly slice versus shred the veggies...but I was experimenting! I'll eat the beet/ginger mix anyway, but know I probably won't make it again with the polyflora A...the jicama, on the other hand, is sliced, but almost too crunchy. I may have to leave that one sitting out longer...




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Drea
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 1:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Daikon radish is more "juicy" than this particular jicama I bought. It was kind of dry and tough, which is why I chose to ferment it, rather than just eat it raw...well, that, and the fact that I couldn't look up the recipe I had planned to use since the Internet went down...


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grey rabbit
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 1:51pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted Text
I prefer my fermented veggies to retain a slight crunch,
On the "wild fermentation" site there is mention of using grape leaves to keep cucumbers crisp, I wonder if it would work for other veggies.

I was wondering if the good bacteria are killed by heat? I was thinking of trying to make a faux ruben sandwich with fermented veggies and sliced turkey. I used to love rubens


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Drea
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The jicama and ginger ferment was a bust. I picked out the ginger, ate it, then tosses the jicama. I don't think slicing the jicama is the way to go (imo). The jury is still out on the jicama/carrot ferment, and I really, really, like the beet/ginger ferment, which is now in the fridge.


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Chloe
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 6:54pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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I let my veggies sit for two days without Polyflora A...and on the 3rd day, add one capsule. I'm
waiting for the bacterial culture to form on its own and then hoping Polyflora's cultures will get combined and grow another day...I'm finding it keeps veggies crisper and so far, they haven't
gone too soft.


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TJ
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 7:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I was so-so about the jicama and carrot, so I got some red cabbage yesterday to add to it, and restarted the ferment.  Drea, I shredded the jicama (and the cabbage).
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JJR
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 8:01pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I was watching a public TV show yesterday and they were making bread on a historical working farm.  They said the starter for the bread got it's cultures from the air and the humidity.  So, I think for sourdough, that's where they're saying it comes from.  Whether that's completely correct or not, I know not.  But with the veggies, that wouldn't be the case because sourdough you let ferment in the open.  The veggies are sealed tight.  At least that's how I've been taught to do it.  


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Chloe
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 8:08pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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What is a tomatillo??  (a bene for me) and does anyone think I can ferment it....or at least combine
it with other ingredients that might taste well with it.




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ABJoe
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 8:24pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Tomatillos are small fruits (used as a vegetable) enclosed in a husk. The fruit resembles a small unripe tomato and is usually green or yellow. The yellow color indicates ripeness, but tomatillos are most often used when they are still green. Green tomatillos are firmer and easier to slice. The husk that holds the fruit is paper-like and is light brown. The flesh is slightly acidic with a hint of lemon. Tomatillos belong to the same family as tomatoes.

More info @:
http://www.fruitsandveggiesmatter.gov/month/tomatillo.html

I have no idea whether they would ferment well...  They would probably be mush when fermented, but the flavor may be fine.


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Chloe
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 8:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thanks ABJoe.... I'm thinking I might be able to squish the other veggies I place in the jar and just
put in small chunks of tomatillos in with it..Or just cut them in half.  Given I live in the Northeast, I don't think I've ever seen or tasted one of these things.  I'm on a quest to find an organic tomatillo.  Why this came to mind is the concept of pickled tomatoes.  I think if I don't squish them, they might
hold their shape.


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Drea
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 9:18pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from TJ
I was so-so about the jicama and carrot, so I got some red cabbage yesterday to add to it, and restarted the ferment.  Drea, I shredded the jicama (and the cabbage).


Yes, I think shredding the jicama would work better, although, I'd just rather eat it fresh .


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passionprincess
Sunday, August 14, 2011, 9:47pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I forgot which thread I posted on but sourdough ferments both aerobically and anaerobically so it is needs to "breathe". It gets it bacteria and yeasts from the air.

San Francisco's sourdough starter has its own lactobacilus name: lactobacilus sanfrancisco!

After finding this out, my goal is to make brown rice starter doughs in all locations I visit from now. It is a bit silly but fun.

Quoted from JJR
I was watching a public TV show yesterday and they were making bread on a historical working farm.  They said the starter for the bread got it's cultures from the air and the humidity.  So, I think for sourdough, that's where they're saying it comes from.  Whether that's completely correct or not, I know not.  But with the veggies, that wouldn't be the case because sourdough you let ferment in the open.  The veggies are sealed tight.  At least that's how I've been taught to do it.  




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