Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register


Main Forum Page  ♦   Latest Posts  ♦   Member Center  ♦   Search  ♦   Archives   ♦   Help   ♦   Log In/Out   ♦   Admins
Forum Login
Login Name: Create a new account
Password:     Forgot password

BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  Cultured Vegetables
Users Browsing Forum
No Members and 12 Guests

Cultured Vegetables  This thread currently has 13,397 views. Print Print Thread
18 Pages « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 » All Recommend Thread
Drea
Wednesday, August 10, 2011, 11:41pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Warrior ~ Taster, NN, ENTJ
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 11,371
Gender: Female
Location: Northern New Mexico
Age: 51
Fermented spinach? I've not thought about fermenting leafy greens. Great suggestion!


Let go of resistance; feel appreciation for what is, and eagerness for what is coming.
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 150 - 438
ruthiegirl
Wednesday, August 10, 2011, 11:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI O+ Gatherer, Healing from Fibromyalgia
Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 11,838
Gender: Female
Location: New York
Age: 41
Beet kvass isn't listed on my SWAMI at all. Beets and beet juice are both beneficials right now, but I was consuming beet kvass even when SWAMI called them both neutral.

I would reccomend fermenting neutral or beneficial veggies, and avoiding fermented black dots.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah (in Israel for the school year), 17yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 151 - 438
grey rabbit
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 12:06am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

swamix 47% Teacher-INFP
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 3,268
Gender: Female
Location: 4-corners U.S.
Age: 57
Quoted from JJR


I'm not really sure if that's completely how it works.  I think the bacteria actually come from the vegetable itself. (if you don't use a starter of some sort)  Unless you're not putting it in an airtight jar.  I use the canning jars with the rubbler lids.  I think the lactic acid comes from the breakdown of the vegetable.  I think.  Now if you're talking sourdough, that may be the case.  


With sourdough the bacteria also come from the wheat itself, not the air.


“Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It’s perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we’ve learned something from yesterday.”

John Wayne's last words
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 152 - 438
TJ
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 12:26am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

54% Nomad
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 3,486
Gender: Male
Location: Midvale, UT, USA
Age: 39
I really like fermented jicama.  I shred it up with carrots.  I started a batch on Sunday, and it should be ready by Friday.

Ruthie, isn't kvass a yeast ferment?  Or do you made yours differently?
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 153 - 438
JJR
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 3:03am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

33% Nomad, calories calories!!!!!!
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 4,960
Gender: Male
Location: Caledonia, WI
Age: 42
Quoted from grey rabbit


With sourdough the bacteria also come from the wheat itself, not the air.


Aaah.  There you go.  I'm not sure where the culture from the air theory came from and if it's true or not.  I had been taught it's from the food itself also.  If I remember correctly.  And I do believe it was from the Nourishing Traditions book.  I'd have to go back and find the spot.  Or maybe it was Donna Gates' book.  Hmmm...


The poster formerly known as "ABNOWAY"

"Finally brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things." - Phillipians 4:8
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 154 - 438
passionprincess
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 3:26am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GTD - Nomad
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,315
Gender: Female
Location: USA
The salt causes the lacto-fermentation in veggies. However, if you oversalt the veggies, the fermentation will slow down.

I wash my cabbage in water after chopping it into bite size pieces and drain the water. Then, I salt the cabbage in bowl, cover it, and let it sit for at least a good 1-3 hours. I found that salting it before I go to bed is the easiest. When you wake up and check the cabbage, you will start to smell some of the fermentation.

I rinse the salt off the cabbage once and add my kimchee spices. I use whey from my milk kefir instead of adding more water to the pepper paste.

I also use sweet apple cider (not the vinegar but the unpasteurized drink which has loads of probiotics) in place of Asian pear (used for sugar to feed the lacto-fermentation and to add a crisp sweetness).

My kimchee is a probiotic variation I came up with. So far, the fermentation is really well done, if I can say so myself, and the flavor is not much different from traditional kimchee. I just make mine less spicy and bit sweeter.

I figured that the kefir whey and sweet apple cider were introducing enough new strains of probiotics on top of the lacto-fermentation so I did not open up a probiotic capsule.


Simplifying my life. Only the best for my body, mind, and soul!

Food: Diamonds > Superfood > Neutrals > Black Dots > Avoids
People: Diamonds > Superfriends > Neutrals > Questionables > Avoids

Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 155 - 438
passionprincess
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 3:31am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GTD - Nomad
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,315
Gender: Female
Location: USA
On sourdough Fermentation

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/10375/lactic-acid-fermentation-sourdough

The fermentation happens in two ways - anaerobic and aerobic. While the fermentation happens because of the component in the grain (bacteria strains), oxygen is needed because some strains use the oxygen.

I just use a coffee filter top for my starter dough so it could breathe. I had to stick it in the fridge when I had fruit flies. The flies are gone so the dough will come back out.  


Simplifying my life. Only the best for my body, mind, and soul!

Food: Diamonds > Superfood > Neutrals > Black Dots > Avoids
People: Diamonds > Superfriends > Neutrals > Questionables > Avoids

Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 156 - 438
Mayflowers
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 2:54pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
I tasted it this morning. It tastes like saurkraut!  Does that mean it's done? I need the experts..
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 157 - 438
Drea
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 3:28pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Warrior ~ Taster, NN, ENTJ
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 11,371
Gender: Female
Location: Northern New Mexico
Age: 51
Yes, I think it's done; but more importantly, do you like the taste?


Let go of resistance; feel appreciation for what is, and eagerness for what is coming.
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 158 - 438
Mayflowers
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 3:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
eh..I'm not a saurkraut lover.  But It's good for me. I'll try different vegies. I have jimica as a neutral, I can use that.  I can't use any cabbage.   It's all an avoid. Even saurkraut..  I can use bok choy. I wonder how that tastes?
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 159 - 438
Mayflowers
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 3:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
Quoted from Drea
Yes, I think it's done; but more importantly, do you like the taste?


How do you eat it Drea?
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 160 - 438
JJR
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 5:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

33% Nomad, calories calories!!!!!!
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 4,960
Gender: Male
Location: Caledonia, WI
Age: 42
Just eat it.  Or put it on some meat.  Or whatever.  It's probably a really good idea to eat it as a relish with meat, because it will help you digest your food.  But as I said, take it slow.  It may detox you.  That may not be a problem for you, but I get lots of pain and inflammation from detoxing.

It helps your adrenals too.  It does lots of good stuff.


The poster formerly known as "ABNOWAY"

"Finally brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things." - Phillipians 4:8
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 161 - 438
Mayflowers
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 7:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
I had some on my veggie burger for lunch ... surprisingly tasty!  Broccolikraut.     I don't think  I want it any more sour so I put it in the refrigerator. How long does it last in the fridge?
Thanks JJR. I'm going to try it on fish.  I can have veal once a week on my SWAMI as well so that might work well. It felt good in my stomach!   No digestion problems!   Does it taste very different if you add a cap of Polyflora to it?  
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 162 - 438
passionprincess
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 8:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GTD - Nomad
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,315
Gender: Female
Location: USA
I just mix my cultured veggies (esp. kimchee) with brown rice and add meat or sardines to it. Korean always have kimchee placed on their rice during their meals. they would wrap it in sushi nori (seaweed), too. Koreans usually roast the seaweed in sesame oil with salt. I prefer the seaweed raw and now know why - sesame oil is an avoid.

You can try mixing your grains/rice with cultured veggies and eating it.


Simplifying my life. Only the best for my body, mind, and soul!

Food: Diamonds > Superfood > Neutrals > Black Dots > Avoids
People: Diamonds > Superfriends > Neutrals > Questionables > Avoids

Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 163 - 438
Drea
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 8:52pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Warrior ~ Taster, NN, ENTJ
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 11,371
Gender: Female
Location: Northern New Mexico
Age: 51
Quoted from 815


How do you eat it Drea?


Right out of the jar!



I just got back from the organic market with some fresh carrots and light red beets. I'm going to make another batch of cultured veggies, once I've had a moment to unwind from the trip into Santa Fe.

Thank you Mayflowers for starting this thread; you've got me back into culturing my veggies!


Let go of resistance; feel appreciation for what is, and eagerness for what is coming.
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 164 - 438
Chloe
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 9:04pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

42% Teacher Rh+ N1, N1b
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,595
Gender: Female
Location: Northeast USA
Age: 71
I'll let you know how this turns out...but today, this is what went into my jars for fermentation.

shredded cucumbers (the kirby variety...farm fresh ones), garlic, ginger, radishes, and one shredded
apple.  I didn't have any more carrots so I thought the apple might add the right amount of sweetness.
WOW, it produced tons of liquid....and I added two Polyflora As because this filled two jars...I'm
going to be eating this until I explode....but I love the idea of just experimenting with all sorts of
vegetables until I find a blend that I love.  Oh, I added a few T of chopped cilantro to this.  It's either
going to taste great....or disgusting.  


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 165 - 438
Chloe
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 9:07pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

42% Teacher Rh+ N1, N1b
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,595
Gender: Female
Location: Northeast USA
Age: 71
Quoted from 815
I had some on my veggie burger for lunch ... surprisingly tasty!  Broccolikraut.     I don't think  I want it any more sour so I put it in the refrigerator. How long does it last in the fridge?
Thanks JJR. I'm going to try it on fish.  I can have veal once a week on my SWAMI as well so that might work well. It felt good in my stomach!   No digestion problems!   Does it taste very different if you add a cap of Polyflora to it?  


Polyflora didn't change the taste of my last batch.

It lasts in the refrigerator quite awhile because it's already fermented....Probably if it starts
looking funky and it's been many weeks, start over with a new batch....but if you're eating some every day, you might just eat it up quickly.  What I do is use smaller jars....make a smaller
batch.  I have quart jars but it takes a lot to fill them.  I have some small saved mayo jars that
are probably a pint.  The perfect size for how fast I eat up one jar.



"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 166 - 438
Drea
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 9:09pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Warrior ~ Taster, NN, ENTJ
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 11,371
Gender: Female
Location: Northern New Mexico
Age: 51
You've given me some ideas, Chloe! Did you shred all the veggies or slice some? I like different textures, so I often julienne some, shred some, and slice some in the same batch...

I may add carrot to the first batch of beets, and add apple to the second. I almost always add ginger root because I love it so much!


Let go of resistance; feel appreciation for what is, and eagerness for what is coming.
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 167 - 438
passionprincess
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 9:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GTD - Nomad
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,315
Gender: Female
Location: USA
When kimchee gets too fermented (tangy and soft), Koreans make soup out of it. Stir fried aged kimchee over eggs taste quite good. You might want to do that if your cultured veggies ever get too tangy. You lose some of the probiotic qualities since you are heating up the veggies but fermented fried veggies taste really good with cheese. An omelet would be really good.


Simplifying my life. Only the best for my body, mind, and soul!

Food: Diamonds > Superfood > Neutrals > Black Dots > Avoids
People: Diamonds > Superfriends > Neutrals > Questionables > Avoids

Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 168 - 438
Drea
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 10:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Warrior ~ Taster, NN, ENTJ
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 11,371
Gender: Female
Location: Northern New Mexico
Age: 51
I just made another batch of cultured veggies and didn't do what I said I was going to...instead, I sliced, julienned, and shredded three red/white beets, sliced and shredded a large ginger root, and added two capsules of Polyflora A along with sea salt. The beets were sweet enough without adding carrots or apples.

I also have a jicama, but I'll wait to make that batch because I want to stagger the finished product.

TJ, if you read this, how do you prepare (slice, shred, etc) your jicama ferment?


Let go of resistance; feel appreciation for what is, and eagerness for what is coming.
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 169 - 438
TJ
Friday, August 12, 2011, 12:40am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

54% Nomad
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 3,486
Gender: Male
Location: Midvale, UT, USA
Age: 39
Quoted from passionprincess
I rinse the salt off the cabbage once and add my kimchee spices.
Do you have a recipe?  Do you use napa cabbage or regular?

Quoted from 815
How long does it last in the fridge?
My first batch lasted over a month in the fridge, with no indication that it was going bad when I ate the last bit.  It could get a little mold growing on top but you can skim that off.  Napa cabbage might be ok for you.  It's unlisted on my SWAMI.

Quoted from Drea
TJ, if you read this, how do you prepare (slice, shred, etc) your jicama ferment?
I shredded mine in the food processor.  The batch I made that also had some cabbage in it was actually better than this last one with just jicama and carrot.  I do have to say, cabbage smells very strong when it first starts fermenting!
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 170 - 438
passionprincess
Friday, August 12, 2011, 12:51am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GTD - Nomad
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,315
Gender: Female
Location: USA
TJ

I posted my kimchee recipe somewhere on this site and can't find it.

Here is a copy I sent to a friend of mine:

1 head of Savoy Cabbage
1/4 cup Sea Salt
1 head of garlic
1 small vidalia (sweet onion)
1/4 cup pepper powder
1/4 cup sweet apple cider (can be found at farmer's market; I used unpasteurized, organic cider)
1/4 cup of brown rice starter flour

How to make brown rice starter flour (should be done about 1-2 days in advance; you can use this starter flour to make sourdough, pancakes, etc.):
mix 1 cup of brown rice and 1 cup of kefir whey (you can use plain kefir if you cannot get the whey) and let it sit at room temperature.
Storing this in a mason jar with a coffee filter "lid" (use a rubberband to hold the lid in place) is the best;
The mixture NEEDS to BREATHE!
"feed" the mixture by adding 2-3 tablespoons of brown rice flour ever 8 hours
The mixture should start bubbling.

Once the mixture starts bubbling, it is ready for use. You can continue to age (ferment) the mixture after you have used a portion for the kimchee. The mixture will continue to grow. If you do not want the mixture to grow, keep the mixture in the refrigerator.

Prepare the Cabbage:
Cut and wash the cabbage, leave a bit of water in the bowl and salt the cabbage
Let the cabbage sit for at least an hour and move the cabbage around so all parts are exposed to the salt and water mixture (brine).

Let the cabbage brine mix sit for a few hours. I just let mine sit overnight.

Prepare the kimchee sauce:
Take the brown rice starter, sweet apple cider, onion, garlic, and pepper powder and blend in the food processor; puree or liquify the entire mixture. Make sure the garlic and onion are pretty much liquid. (Koreans do not puree the mixture and use chopped garlic and onions but I prefer to make a liquid sauce since it is easier to mix; I do not like fresh ginger so I intentionally left it out).

Mix the "sauce" into the cabbage and put into a kimchee jar. Although the kimchee can be eaten fresh, the flavors become more complex as it ages. Also, the probiotic content increases with the fermentation process.

**I keep a jar of starter flour so I don't have to make one.**


Simplifying my life. Only the best for my body, mind, and soul!

Food: Diamonds > Superfood > Neutrals > Black Dots > Avoids
People: Diamonds > Superfriends > Neutrals > Questionables > Avoids

Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 171 - 438
passionprincess
Friday, August 12, 2011, 1:02am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GTD - Nomad
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,315
Gender: Female
Location: USA
Korean White Kimchee - Does not use pepper paste

**This kimchee broth in this recipe creates a kvass like clear, slightly salty, tangy kvass like base. Koreans will often make rice noodles and pour the kimchee plus broth over the noodle for a refreshing summer dish, usually with barbeque since the crisp broth will tone the greasiness of the meat. Also, I have seen people drink the kimchee broth as a hangover drink. **

from Korea Times by Kim, Yong Ja

White Cabbage with Garlic and Ginger

This is a rare non-spicy kimchi. It should be served cold to enjoy its refreshing flavor.

INGREDIENTS (serves 4)

1 CHINESE CABBAGE (2¾ lbs/1.25 kg)

SEA SALT or KOSHER SALT

2 GARLIC CLOVES, crushed fine

1"/2.5 cm GINGER, cut into fine strips

3 SCALLIONS, cut diagonally

1 heaping tablespoon PINE NUTS optional

small amount SILGOCHU (chili thread) used mainly for decoration, has very little flavor

1 cup WATER

⅓ teaspoon SALT to add at the end on top

1. Trim the cabbage and wash outer leaves. Slice the middle of the bottom about 4"/10 cm deep. Put your thumbs in the slit and pull it apart to divide it into two. Then divide each half into two parts.

2. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon salt over the stem area. Soak all cabbage leaves in salted water (1 tablespoon kosher salt for 1 cup water ratio) for about 4-5 hours. Salt has many different strengths, use your own judgment as to the amount of salt to use in wilting the cabbage. When the leaves are wilted, press gently to squeeze out the excess water.

3. While the cabbage is wilting, prepare garlic, ginger and scallion and mix together.

4. Cut off the two large pieces of the cabbage stems and set aside. Sprinkle the scallion mixture, pine nuts and silgochu (chili thread) in between the cabbage leaves.

5. Put them in the jar. Press down to reduce any air pocket. Add a cup of water to the bowl where you mixed the garlic and scallion. Season with 1 tablespoon salt. Pour down the side of the jar to soak ¾ of the kimchi.

6. Cover the top with the large pieces of cabbage that you had set aside. Sprinkle salt on top. Close the jar and leave at room temperature for 1½ days to ripen. Then store in the refrigerator.

7. When serving, set aside the top layer, pull out a cabbage piece and cut into bite sizes. Always put the top layer back before you close the lid.


Simplifying my life. Only the best for my body, mind, and soul!

Food: Diamonds > Superfood > Neutrals > Black Dots > Avoids
People: Diamonds > Superfriends > Neutrals > Questionables > Avoids

Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 172 - 438
Drea
Friday, August 12, 2011, 1:29am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Warrior ~ Taster, NN, ENTJ
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 11,371
Gender: Female
Location: Northern New Mexico
Age: 51
My turnip kimchee is done! It could stand another day, but is good just as it is, too! That took 2 days, but it's been very hot here.


Let go of resistance; feel appreciation for what is, and eagerness for what is coming.
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 173 - 438
Chloe
Friday, August 12, 2011, 1:44am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

42% Teacher Rh+ N1, N1b
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,595
Gender: Female
Location: Northeast USA
Age: 71
Quoted from Drea
You've given me some ideas, Chloe! Did you shred all the veggies or slice some? I like different textures, so I often julienne some, shred some, and slice some in the same batch...

I may add carrot to the first batch of beets, and add apple to the second. I almost always add ginger root because I love it so much!


I shredded the cucumbers, shredded the radishes, smashed the garlic with a mallet and chopped
it...I cut the apple in thin slices and chopped the cilantro. I cut the ginger into little pieces.  Basically
it looks like a big mush in the jar...


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 174 - 438
18 Pages « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 » All Recommend Thread
Print Print Thread

BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  Cultured Vegetables

Thread Rating
There is currently no rating for this thread