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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  Oats contain gluten
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Oats contain gluten  This thread currently has 1,322 views. Print Print Thread
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JJR
Wednesday, October 1, 2008, 2:51am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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According to Genova Diagnostics, which just sent me my results of an IGg and IGe test.  

I thought it didn't.  Oh well.  I'm supposed to rotate it every 4 days anyways.  I have a Very Low IGg reaction to it.  Among other things.  But nothing earth shattering except that I have to avoid onions for 3 months.  I eat them almost every day and I thought it seemed like they gave me energy.  Maybe it was just eating and not the onions.  I always had them on salads.


The poster formerly known as "ABNOWAY"

"Finally brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things." - Phillipians 4:8
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italybound
Wednesday, October 1, 2008, 2:54am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Many times it's that oats are cross contaminated in some way between harvest and your bowl.



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Amazone I.
Wednesday, October 1, 2008, 7:42am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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nearly all cereales do contain a sort and amount of gluten, thatswhy the nonnies are better on seeds ....like quinoa or
amaranth ..... even the intake of millet sets my energy down ....


MIfHI K-174
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Eric
Wednesday, October 1, 2008, 7:58am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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Bob's Red Mill makes gluten-free oats!


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JJR
Wednesday, October 1, 2008, 1:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from Eric
Bob's Red Mill makes gluten-free oats!



Interesting, I wonder what they do to make it gluten free?  


The poster formerly known as "ABNOWAY"

"Finally brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things." - Phillipians 4:8
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Melissa_J
Wednesday, October 1, 2008, 9:08pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Hunter
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They just take out the wheat, which is no small feat, as they check it for contamination all along the way, then elisa test it at the end.

I'm not sure what test they did to show that you are reacting to oats, or if the oats they tested your reaction for were gluten free or regular.

I react a bit to the gluten free oats, myself, so I avoid them.  My boys do fine with them, but aren't as fond of them as I was.


Type O+ blogger, secretor afterall. Gluten intolerant. With two gluten intolerant sons:  A+ Secretor 10 yo (also fructose intolerant and slightly egg allergic), and  O- 7yo.
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Ribbit
Wednesday, October 1, 2008, 9:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Yeah, evidently oats in and of themselves don't contain gluten, ABNW.  It's just that they pick it up from being stored in the same bins as wheat or grown in the same fields that wheat was grown in last year and they get all mixed up.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Brighid45
Wednesday, October 1, 2008, 9:39pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

INFJ
Kyosha Nim
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As far as I've been able to find out, GF oats are usually processed in machines that are dedicated to oats alone. Most commercial brands like Quaker are processed in the same machines that make wheat products and I can tell you, those machines are seldom if ever cleaned (usually they run 24/7). So some cross-contamination comes from there.

Sometimes the GF oats are grown in fields that are dedicated for oats only (and probably some cover crops to enrich the soil). Or the oats are gone over very carefully to remove 'volunteer' wheat grains.


Everyone is entitled to his or her informed opinion. --H. Ellison
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JJR
Thursday, October 2, 2008, 12:12am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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What you guys are saying is different than what this guide is saying.  It's from Genova Diagnostics and it's called the "True Relief, food rotation plan".  It's an insert they send you with the results of the test.

Here is the paragraph quoted:

"More about Food Relationships

Grains containing a significant amount of gluten are wheat and rye, which are most closely related, as well as barley and oats, which are more distant "cousins", but still related.  Triticale is a hybrid of wheat and rye.  Therefore, wheat, rye, triticale, oats, and barley are included in the Gluten Containing Grains family.  Becuase gluten is the most allergenic component of these grains, it is also tested for and included in the family.  Spelt and Kamut are ancient varieties of wheat and may be considered the same as gluten for the purposes of allergies and intolerences."


So, somebody is wrong.  I have no clue who, because I'm no expert on gluten.  But, regardless, I'm actually not allergic to gluten, wheat or yeast for that matter.  Which is a good thing.  I just know I've been battling candida.  Although, I think it's going pretty well.  I think.  I still get cloudy head feeling sometimes.  Up and down, but my tongue looks ALOT better than it used to (less white) and I'm feeling overall better.  Last time I did the spit test though, it still showed I have it.  

As an aside, I may have said this before but I swear when I started taking milk thistle it made my head feel ALOT better for a while and not barely cloudy at all.  Which makes me think the cloudy head feeling is more from my liver detoxing or not being up to snuff.  FWIW.


The poster formerly known as "ABNOWAY"

"Finally brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things." - Phillipians 4:8
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Melissa_J
Thursday, October 2, 2008, 12:35am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Some information is old, because GF oats have only recently become available.  Even pure oats do have some proteins that are similar to gluten, however, and until recently it was thought that all celiacs reacted similarly to them.  Now it is known that most celiacs do not (but some still do, myself included).

The only way to tell for sure is to ask the lab if it makes a difference on their results if you have GF oats.

As for me, I avoid them.  There are plenty of other whole grains I can eat.  My body thinks many things are gluten that are not gluten (like oats and casein), and I don't know when that confusion will be cleared up.  

Is it true that the body can confuse candida proteins with gluten proteins as well?  There's some link there, which may be affecting me.  My white lines are improving now that I've cut out all casein and GF oats, in addition to gluten.


Type O+ blogger, secretor afterall. Gluten intolerant. With two gluten intolerant sons:  A+ Secretor 10 yo (also fructose intolerant and slightly egg allergic), and  O- 7yo.
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Ribbit
Thursday, October 2, 2008, 1:54pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from Melissa_J
My body thinks many things are gluten that are not gluten


My husband's body thinks arrowroot is gluten.  Any type of thickener like that bothers him.  Arrowroot, potato starch, tapioca, you name it.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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TJ
Thursday, October 2, 2008, 2:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Melissa, aren't oats an O-nonnie avoid?  That could also explain your reaction.
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JJR
Thursday, October 2, 2008, 4:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Dang drive, you know your stuff.  I don't know much about the O diet because my step dad and one girl I work with are the only ones I know.  My Dad doesn't do the diet.  The girl does though.  We converted her!!!  


The poster formerly known as "ABNOWAY"

"Finally brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things." - Phillipians 4:8
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Mayflowers
Thursday, October 2, 2008, 5:17pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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My O son won't eat oats. He's pretty much an O with his choices, except wheat. I just told him if he has digestive trouble in the future to give up the wheat and grains.
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teri
Thursday, October 2, 2008, 5:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from TJ
Melissa, aren't oats an O-nonnie avoid?  That could also explain your reaction.
Lectins might be the problem. This link explains that some people react to lectins in oats in the same way that some would react to gluten in other grains...

http://www.healthnowmedical.com/info/gluten_foods.html



I'm onto you, 'euphoria'
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Melissa_J
Thursday, October 2, 2008, 7:39pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Hunter
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Yes, it's an O-nonnie avoid, is it a Hunter toxin too?  It's a gatherer superfood, so I tried it a few times.  I may just be too lectin sensitive to go into the realm of some gatherer superfoods (oats, cheese, and, of course, barley).

My son's body thinks carageenan is gluten too.


Type O+ blogger, secretor afterall. Gluten intolerant. With two gluten intolerant sons:  A+ Secretor 10 yo (also fructose intolerant and slightly egg allergic), and  O- 7yo.
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footprints.
Tuesday, October 7, 2008, 5:29am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Okay all BTD's who are sensitive to wheat and wheat gluten like myself: What would be the best kind of oats to eat? I've read that rolled oats and steel cuts are okay, what say you all? Please advise and let me know. Thanks.  
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Melissa_J
Tuesday, October 7, 2008, 6:44am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Hunter
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If you are sensitive, then I'd stick with the certified gluten free oats.  All others can have wheat contamination, some more than others, but they all can.

I recommend GF oats for anybody who should avoid wheat, but especially those of us who are extra sensitive.

They can be more expensive, so you may want to look for a good bulk source.  If you're sensitive to Gluten you'll want to stagger them with other allowed grains, as only so many servings per week are recommended for celiacs, even if they tolerate them well.


Type O+ blogger, secretor afterall. Gluten intolerant. With two gluten intolerant sons:  A+ Secretor 10 yo (also fructose intolerant and slightly egg allergic), and  O- 7yo.
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Brighid45
Tuesday, October 7, 2008, 11:02am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

INFJ
Kyosha Nim
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Footprints, I'd say based on my own experience, if you can find whole or steel-cut oats, they're the best bet for least contamination. Rolled oats are created by steaming whole oat groats, or grains, and crushing them between two rollers. Many companies use those same rollers to crush wheat and corn to make flakes for cereal, granola bars, etc. So the more whole the oat groat is, the less likely it is to be contaminated with an avoid grain.

However, as Melissa says, certified gluten-free oats are the way to go if you're really gluten-sensitive.

http://www.glutenfreeoats.com/


Everyone is entitled to his or her informed opinion. --H. Ellison
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TJ
Tuesday, October 7, 2008, 6:30pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Brighid45
Rolled oats are created by steaming whole oat groats, or grains, and crushing them between two rollers. Many companies use those same rollers to crush wheat and corn to make flakes for cereal, granola bars, etc. So the more whole the oat groat is, the less likely it is to be contaminated with an avoid grain.

Do you know how we get oat bran?
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Brighid45
Tuesday, October 7, 2008, 9:28pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

INFJ
Kyosha Nim
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Oat bran is the outer coat of the oat grain. To get just the bran, it's mechanically milled off the grain. The bran-less grains are then used for flour or made into quick-cooking oats. 'Old-fashioned' oats are grains rolled with the bran still on--that's why they take longer to cook (but are better for you because of the soluable fiber and other good stuff in the bran).


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jayneeo
Tuesday, October 7, 2008, 10:01pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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this week I've had steel cut oats twice. Good thing I'm retired, they take forever to cook. but yummmm!
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TJ
Tuesday, October 7, 2008, 10:31pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I knew there was a reason "old-fashioned" oats tasted better.  Thanks for the info!
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Lola
Wednesday, October 8, 2008, 12:46am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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try soaking them overnight, less cooking next day!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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Brighid45
Thursday, October 9, 2008, 11:34am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

INFJ
Kyosha Nim
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D55, you are more than welcome

Jaynee--get a one-quart slow cooker and cook the steel-cut oats overnight. They turn out really creamy and delicious! And it's sooo nice to wake up to your oatmeal ready and waiting for you

I use the ratio of 1/3 cup oats to 2/3 cup water--that's one serving per person. (You might need to experiment a bit and find out if you need a little more or a little less water.) The night before, using ICE-COLD water--the coldest water you can get that isn't frozen--put the water in the slow cooker and stir in the oats. Add a pinch of sea salt if you like. Then cover, put on the LOW setting and go to bed. It's that easy.

You can make whole oats this way too. The oat groats will burst as they cook and make a nice creamy oatmeal, just as the rolled and steel-cut oats do.

For many years my mom made oats this way, and I still do now and then on the weekends. There is nothing like taking off the lid off the slow cooker and breathing in that wonderful fragrance of cooked oats. Heaven!


Everyone is entitled to his or her informed opinion. --H. Ellison
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