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Learning to be an A in an O world  This thread currently has 1,350 views. Print Print Thread
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aprilshowers
Saturday, September 20, 2008, 1:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Warrior (I think)
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Posts: 48
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Seriously, I live in the upper midwest of the US.  This is MEAT country and WI is the DAIRY state!  I also live in small town USA.  The largest big cities are Minneapolis/St Paul, MN and they are 65+ miles away.  

Everyone in my world may not actually be an O, but they eat like they are.  Well, let me qualify that - they eat like a very unhealthy O, and like I used to eat!  Steak, potatoes, white bread and apple pie!

It's a stuggle to be eating this way in the environment I live in.  I'm telling only a few about the BTD just because I know what I'm up against - the rolling eyes, the skeptical looks, the "oh, trying another diet" knowing looks, mmhhh.  It's easier to say I'm eating more vegetarian to try and get my LDL down.  Just like it was easier before to say I was dieting to get my diabetic A1c numbers down and to not have to take meds to control it. Still, even that is sometimes hard to understand in a world where most are happy to go on meds so they can continue to eat what they want.  

Food has such a hold on people, it's frightening.

I know more and more people who are opting for gastric bypass to lose weight.  Have to because they are morbidly obese and are ruining their joints - needing knee and hip replacements.  A lady at church just had the surgery Wed and a close friend is very interested.  This drastic surgery is more accteptable than making major changes to your diet and eating for your BT like I am - amazing!

What started this rant?  Is ranting a common A-thing.   It's my Dad's birthday on Sunday.  I offered to fix dinner for them, to bring it to their home even since my step-mom doesn't like my cats and is uncomfortable at my house.  Seemed like a great idea, a nice gift for them to celebrate the day, and I could monitor what I was eating better too.  Nope, not gonna happen!  My step-mom called the other night, they were at Sam's Club (heaven for the Super-Size it crowd), and they picked up a HAM, she'll make mashed potatoes and gravy and green beans and homemade white-bread buns...., so much easier and soooo good - everyone likes HAM!  OH! and there will be the traditional white birthday cake from the bakery at the grocery store I'm sure. Sigh.....

So, I'm bringing the zucchini casserole I planned from the start anyway for just me probably.  I'll have to explain that I'm trying to get my LDL down as the reason why I'm not eating the HAM or mashed potatoes and gravy or risk hurting my step-mom's feelings.  My poor Type-A dad - he will never be able to eat like an A, even if I told him about it and he was able to accept the idea.  My step mom will NEVER give up her HAM, and that's why I keep writing it in capital letters!  She adores HAM - ugggh!  I have a natural aversion to it and have never been able to eat it.  In fact growing up we never had ham because my mom said it didn't agree with my dad.  Well, he has to eat it now with my step-mom cooking.

OH, and what am I doing today?  My good friend's son and new daughter-in-law are having a wedding reception at church and I offered to help with the cooking.  I'm making an Italian pasta salad with wheat pasta and that yucky bottled Italian dressing.  I can't even put in all the veggies I'd like, because they don't like them all....

I think I'm starting off my day on a definite rant.  Seriously, is this an A thing to get so riled and upset by things I cannot change??  I sometimes feel like I live in a world where I'm the only one willing to do things differently.  I don't want to end up like my dad who has just retreated into a box most of the time in order to survive.  I don't want to end up surviving on drugs for my diabetes and for my cholesterol and maybe get cancer, although I've always considered I came from relatively good genes since we have no cancer on either side of the family except for my mom who only got it from smoking for 60+ years...

I've been very crabby for the last two days, can anyone tell me - is this normal?  I was following the suggestions in the E4YBT with Diabetes and have been easying into this very slowly.  Just this week I've had two completely vegetarian days and am pulling more and more foods from the beneficial list.  Am I going through withdrawal of some kind?  I haven't eaten white sugar, only a little raw honey on my oatmeal, for over a year.  I an gluten intollerant so don't eat any wheat and monitor that pretty well - thankfully that's getting more and more press so people kind of understand that now.  

I did have some wild rice salad from the deli at the grocery store yesterday at work.  I suppose there was sugar in that and I suppose the mayo..., but I felt crabby BEFORE I ate that.  In fact I grabbed it because I was feeling so crabby.  Stress eating - a big no-no for an A, right?  

How did you A's conquer that one??

OK, enough ranting - I need to go finish that lovely salad I won't be eating any of.  HOW does someone cook something they can't eat??  I'm single - don't  have to deal with cooking for a different blood type, thank God.

Do you other A's have these mental shifts in your thoughts all the time that you can't stop?  Is that an A-thing too?!@@#$%$#%  Do A's not like being typed??



Type II diabetic following BTD for Type A secretor for diabetics.

We are what we repeatedly do.
- Aristotle

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TJ
Saturday, September 20, 2008, 1:54pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I'm not an A, but I have sure had a few rants on this forum!  We all have those days/weeks.  Sometimes I feel the same way about members of my family.  I love them very much, and I know that the blood type or genotype diet would help them with their various health problems, but some of them completely reject it.  Sometimes I'm angry at their stubbornness, sometimes I'm just discouraged, and sometimes I'm in acceptance.  My father has been working some of the BTD into his life, but not my step-mother.  My mother and step-father won't even consider it; I think mother would if it was just up to her, but my step-father is adamantly against any kind of change I suggest in diet, and she doesn't want to make trouble.

This whole thing goes beyond dietary issues too.  Anytime we see people we love engaging in self-destructive behavior, it hurts.  When they reject our offers of help, that hurts even more.
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aprilshowers
Saturday, September 20, 2008, 2:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Oh dear, I'm back and re-reading this and want to just say I'm not bashing any O's.  Of course someone with type O blood doing the BTD wouldn't eat like anyone I mentioned either!

Thanks drive55 (I do by the way, saves gas!) - I like your signature, both are so true.  And you hit the nail on the head - fustration with my family, where does it ever get me but riled up?  

I'm going to go take a long walk and clear my head on this beautiful day, and not think about HAM or anything the whole time!


Type II diabetic following BTD for Type A secretor for diabetics.

We are what we repeatedly do.
- Aristotle

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marmalade
Saturday, September 20, 2008, 2:18pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Firstly Aprilshowers, let me say that you should be so proud of yourself! Look at you! You are not giving in to the fast and easy quick fix of gastric by-passes like the rest of them AND you are not giving in to the peer pressure of those who give you a hard time about the diet. I would probably take the salad along with ALL the vegies in it anyway, and if no one eats it, I'd take it home for dinner! ahah. But I know in the real world it is probably very hard to do that. But I would be tempted......


Everyone has a crabby day, and when you do, you should stop and think how good a job you are doing and be secure in knowing that you are strong. Let the others think what they want. As Drive55 has said very well indeed, alot of people will reject the diet and it hurts. I find that too. I agreed with everything Drive55 said because I am already experiencing this even though I have been on the diet such a short time (not even a week) Already I am happily telling people about it, esp those who I know NEED IT BADLY and yet THEY are the worst when it comes to rejecting it. Oh well. You can only throw the ball and hope someone catches it.

Don't worry about you crabby days. Everyone has them. I am an A too. I battle with nerves and anxiety for silly reasons. I cannot let something that hurts me go sometimes. I read the personality type for an A and I was like "yup......that's me!"
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Maldo
Saturday, September 20, 2008, 5:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from aprilshowers
S
Food has such a hold on people, it's frightening.

I know more and more people who are opting for gastric bypass to lose weight.  Have to because they are morbidly obese and are ruining their joints - needing knee and hip replacements.  



Ive been in New York a few months and have been amazed about that to.   Also the prevalence of plastic surgery - intricate surgery being discussed while eating ANY food thats within arms reach.    (thereby witnessing 3-problems at one time: the failings of the medical system, problems in the food chain in free market, and lifestyle complacency)

Anyway, persevere there with whats good for you, and good luck...  


"You're not disabled by the disabilities you have, you are able by the abilities you have." - Oscar Pistorius
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Ribbit
Sunday, September 21, 2008, 12:27am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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The problem isn't with the free market, Maldo.  The problem is moderation and balance in a culture of extremes.  The problem is lack of temperance and self-control.  I also have another unpopular theory but that's for another thread if anybody's interested--it's called Not Making Your Baby "Cry It Out."  In short, I am beginning to believe that the whole American theory of sticking your crying baby in a dark room all by himself and leaving him to cry and cry and cry until he "learns" to fall asleep on his own is causing a lot more long-term problems that anybody cares to admit.  I think it causes the baby to shut down emotionally and what he does learn (besides putting himself to sleep) is that nobody cares about him, nobody answers his call, nobody comes when he needs somebody most.  So what do we do when we grow older?  We already learned that we do not find comfort in people.  So we turn to what does make us feel good--food.  We eat and eat and eat trying to find emotional fulfillment that we should find in people--friends and family.  Spouse!  Good grief!  I was upset at DH the other night because he wanted me to just let Julia cry.  I had a few words to say to him about it (highly unusual for me to take that position with him) and I told him what I thought.  I explained all the above.  I said, "You know what?  We're supposed to turn to God for help. But do we?  We're supposed to turn to our family for encouragement.  But do we?  We're supposed to turn to each other for love.  But do we?  No, because we learned really early on that nobody cares about us.  We learned on a very deep, core level that we will be abandoned when we most need somebody because our mothers abandoned us to the crib in a dark room to scream in terror and loneliness.  That's why we eat too much.  That's why we're addicted to sugar.  That's why we can't even turn to each other when we need someone to give us a hug.  Because we know we can't trust anybody.  The only good, reliable thing in life is food."  He was so shocked he just said, "Well.  You've given me some things to think about."  

Imagine your country under the wealth that we've experienced, Maldo.  Would y'all do any differently?  Maybe, until your mothers started leaving the infants to "cry it out" instead of cuddling up with them during the night and nursing them back to sleep.  I would guess that with prosperity and plenty of food y'all would do the same, or at least your children and grandchildren would.  

Sorry, I didn't mean to vent.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O

Revision History (1 edits)
Ribbit  -  Sunday, September 21, 2008, 12:39am
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Chris
Sunday, September 21, 2008, 1:18am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Been a long day, but I must respond to what Ribbit said above.  I think I was remembering just the other day an instance that happened years ago.  I was at a friend of the family's house.  I don't remember how old I was, maybe ten.  This friend of the family had an infant that was crying.  And she did the let it cry itself to sleep thing.  It was awful.  I, thank the universe, was not raised this way.  Actually, I think I got lots of cuddling time with my mom.  I was nursed until age three.  I'm not even sure when the "normal" time to stop nursing is.  I know that today I am doing well (not resorting to addictive behaviors) in big part because my girlfriend likes to cuddle.  In fact she said "likes to cuddle" in her profile or whatever you call it at the dating site that I met her at.  That was a big reason I contacted her and am still with her.  Lastly, I remember my psychology teacher talking about the importance of cuddling.  It's good stuff if you ask me.
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TJ
Sunday, September 21, 2008, 1:35am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Ribbit
The problem isn't with the free market, Maldo.  The problem is moderation and balance in a culture of extremes.  The problem is lack of temperance and self-control.

I agree, the "market" simply provides what there is a demand for, and people nowadays are demanding the kinds of food they are getting.

Quoted from Ribbit
I also have another unpopular theory but that's for another thread if anybody's interested--it's called Not Making Your Baby "Cry It Out."

I've never thought about it like this before!
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Paulppaul
Sunday, September 21, 2008, 1:59am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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It can be hard for people to understand.  I cooked my mom a complete meal and desert for her type and after words she felt great and wanted to know more.  But my dad on the other hand is stubborn but I don't push the diet on either of them.  The mind likes what it likes, my dad likes his beer and that's a good thing to me, I'm not going to take something away from him that gives him joy.  

I'm not afraid to let people know I'm on this diet no matter who they are because I had to evolve and do what I think is right and not worry what other people think.  I think people respond better to you when your a leader and do what you think is right, well thats how it is in the O world I live in.  
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Mayflowers
Sunday, September 21, 2008, 2:07am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Hi Aprilshowers,

It's not easy to resist things that we know are not the best for us. Do the best that you can and know that sometimes you might cheat but as long as you get right back on the program, it won't be too bad. Everyone here has their own level of compliance.  I said it before that there are some things I just refuse to give up but I'm still following semi vegetarian when I say that. (I mean corn, honey..) I don't eat red meat anymore. I never really liked it anyway.  
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Maldo
Sunday, September 21, 2008, 7:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Ribbit
--it's called Not Making Your Baby "Cry It Out."  


Its a good topic for a new thread.
I have no objection to all comments made.

I should clarify that my main concern is the huge commercial pressure on the food supply chain drastically distorts and effects the food we eat.    Pesticides, fertilizers, feed types, genetic modification are all the result of someone trying to make a $ somewhere, and thereby stay in business (no objection to that).   As a result a lot of the food out there, looks like food, and kind of smells like food, but is actually something pretty different to what our ancestors ate, say a few hundred years ago...




"You're not disabled by the disabilities you have, you are able by the abilities you have." - Oscar Pistorius
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Maria Giovanna
Sunday, September 21, 2008, 8:40pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Hi Leanne, I was raised letting me cry for two days when at home from the hospital and when my mother came to nurse me I was always awake  but not crying after the first days or a week.
Luckily I was nursed 9 months by my mother and had cuddle time with her however my mother remebered the pain to let me cry when I was 30 it was difficult also for her. My father feared to spoil me and that my sleep and their sleep would have been disrupted sleeping in their room or comin for every cry. I never cried, weept or seemed afraid as a child, but this has been a real pressure together with being the first child and having to be exemplar for my sister and brother.
To be parents is to be not perfect, but with being caring, cosiderate and flexible and living the value you preach every child would love his or her parents.
My sster was more rebel and is more severe with her sons, as she was compelled to adhere to the house rules with a more unstoppable character.
Just my experience on your wise words !
Maria Guovanna


INTJ Italy celiac��
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Andrea AWsec
Sunday, September 21, 2008, 8:54pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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It was a big thing when my kids were little ( now 19 and 15) the "let them cry thing".
My kids spent years in my bed none of which I regret. One day each on their own they decided they had enough of us and off to their own beds they went.
I didn't tell that many people they just couldn't understand.
I think A's have less tolerance for crying babies then O's.
HMM now where did I read that?


MIFHI

"Do not try to satisfy your vanity by teaching a great many things. Awaken people's curiosity. It is enough to open minds; do not overload them." Anatole France

"Healthy people have the least overt symptoms from eating avoid foods." Dr. D'Adamo
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TJ
Sunday, September 21, 2008, 9:01pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I don't mean to interrupt the current train of thought, but I was thinking about the topic of the thread, and have another take on it.  Here in the USA, extroversion and boldness are traits admired by our culture.  I have a friend from Sweden who observed that there seem to be many more extroverted types in America than in Europe.  We think of these traits as type O traits, so in a way, we Americans are living in a type O world!

Ribbit, you should start a thread about the crying thing, if you have more to say about it.
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Jenny
Sunday, September 21, 2008, 9:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Dear Ribbit,
You are a true exemplar!I have watched my now 12 months old grandson being raised the way you describe, and he is a baby who loves to cuddle - but only after checking who the person is that he is willing to go to. Due to reflux that is only now being dealt with, he has always found horizontal sleeping painful, and so he sleeps with Mummy on a slight angle in her arms, day and night. The books of Sears et al have been a godsend, and now a wonderful little book called "Raising your spirited child" by Mary Sheedy Kurcinka is a lifetime friend.
Well done you!
Jenny



Eating half and exercising double.
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Maria Giovanna
Sunday, September 21, 2008, 9:08pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ditto Andrea, when having at home my sister with her newborn for twenty days after birth, I heard him crying also as a hidden sound in the other building noises ! nearly allucinations ! It is not usualin western world to have kids sleeping with mother, but Desmond Morris the ethologist  wrote that the human kids are the only kids in nature obliged to sleep without their mother.
Maria Giovanna


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honeybee
Sunday, September 21, 2008, 10:52pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Maria Giovanna
It is not usualin western world to have kids sleeping with mother, but Desmond Morris the ethologist  wrote that the human kids are the only kids in nature obliged to sleep without their mother.
Maria Giovanna


never had a lil babe, maybe one day, can not imagine leaving something I nurture to cry it out in the dark, or wherever, alone.. to comfort vs to control?
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honeybee
Sunday, September 21, 2008, 10:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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aprilshowers, good on you, best thing is to make your own zucchini bake, take it along, enjoy your own cooking, enjoy the rush of real food!
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Lola
Monday, September 22, 2008, 2:53am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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aprilshowers
Monday, September 22, 2008, 12:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Well, I survived the family gathering yesterday by reminding myself that it was a celebration of my Dad's birthday and not about me!  My zucchini hotdish was well received, didn't bring any home, and got a request for the recipe so that was nice!  Lots and lots of food that I don't choose to eat any longer, but favorites for everyone else there and the "birthday boy" so I guess that's what birthdays are supposed to be - food, fun and family, however you mix it up.  

Blended families can be a challenge - so many emotions dancing around, I know a lot of my stress Saturday was in anticipation of yesterday and not quite knowing where I fit into my Dad's family.  He's been remarried for over 30 years, but for many of those years we didn't see him and he's built a new life with a family very differnt from the one I grew up in.  Slowly resoration and healing is coming which is wonderful.  If that happens over ham for them and zucchini for me, I guess that's the way it's supposed to be and I am thankful.


Type II diabetic following BTD for Type A secretor for diabetics.

We are what we repeatedly do.
- Aristotle

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goro1
Monday, September 22, 2008, 3:30pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Hello - this is my first post although I've been perusing these forums for almost 2 months now.  Aprilshowers I wanted to say I'm glad you stuck to the diet and everything went well at your dad's b-day party.  I think each person has their own timing in deciding to do things.  When my mom came from Europe in February of this year to visit she had told me about the BTD (I had been cooking bulghur [cracked wheat] dish and she warned me that wasn't good for our blood type [both O-]) and I totally dismissed her. Then my 11-year old niece in the beginning of August had been visiting my family in Europe and my mom had lent her the BTD book and she sent me an email about the different types of fruit that she was supposed to be eating and such and I thought maybe I should check out this diet.  I've never been one to diet - don't like the idea of restriction - but IMO this isn't so much a diet as a change in lifestyle.  I haven't totally conformed to the portion sizes but focused more on getting rid of all the avoids especially wheat and corn.  And I'm happy to say that my daily bloated gas/pain feeling is for the most part gone and I'm down 12 pounds in seven weeks (was 218 when I started and 5'5" so plenty to go but am in no big rush).  My point being that there still may be hope in converting/educating your family/friends, but if they are not accepting/willing then don't be frustrated/insulted.  You know you are doing your body good and that is what is important!  And if you can get them to be open to the prospect of doing something better for their body great, if not so be it.


There is no such thing as "I cannot" only "I do not want to" - Greek Proverb
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sissalem
Monday, September 22, 2008, 3:50pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Ribbit
The problem isn't with the free market, Maldo.  The problem is moderation and balance in a culture of extremes.  The problem is lack of temperance and self-control.  I also have another unpopular theory but that's for another thread if anybody's interested--it's called Not Making Your Baby "Cry It Out."  In short, I am beginning to believe that the whole American theory of sticking your crying baby in a dark room all by himself and leaving him to cry and cry and cry until he "learns" to fall asleep on his own is causing a lot more long-term problems that anybody cares to admit.  I think it causes the baby to shut down emotionally and what he does learn (besides putting himself to sleep) is that nobody cares about him, nobody answers his call, nobody comes when he needs somebody most.  So what do we do when we grow older?  We already learned that we do not find comfort in people.  So we turn to what does make us feel good--food.  We eat and eat and eat trying to find emotional fulfillment that we should find in people--friends and family.  Spouse!  Good grief!  I was upset at DH the other night because he wanted me to just let Julia cry.  I had a few words to say to him about it (highly unusual for me to take that position with him) and I told him what I thought.  I explained all the above.  I said, "You know what?  We're supposed to turn to God for help. But do we?  We're supposed to turn to our family for encouragement.  But do we?  We're supposed to turn to each other for love.  But do we?  No, because we learned really early on that nobody cares about us.  We learned on a very deep, core level that we will be abandoned when we most need somebody because our mothers abandoned us to the crib in a dark room to scream in terror and loneliness.  That's why we eat too much.  That's why we're addicted to sugar.  That's why we can't even turn to each other when we need someone to give us a hug.  Because we know we can't trust anybody.  The only good, reliable thing in life is food."  He was so shocked he just said, "Well.  You've given me some things to think about."  

Imagine your country under the wealth that we've experienced, Maldo.  Would y'all do any differently?  Maybe, until your mothers started leaving the infants to "cry it out" instead of cuddling up with them during the night and nursing them back to sleep.  I would guess that with prosperity and plenty of food y'all would do the same, or at least your children and grandchildren would.  

Sorry, I didn't mean to vent.



Wow! I was just talking with some friends of mine who are parents about this exact same thing! I think it's appalling not to hold your child or give them the comfort and love that they need. Where the heck else are they going to get it??? And then the only time you're really holding them is when you're feeding them, too. Hmmmmmm... I totally agree with you, totally. They learn trust and affection by holding them and loving them and we need more of that in our world.


"Thoughts Become Things" - The collection of entities known as Abraham.
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Raquel
Monday, September 22, 2008, 5:01pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI TEACHER
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,458
Gender: Female
Location: Tenerife-Spain
Age: 50
Recently, I was listening a psychologist who said that the next generations will be more aggressive because the children of few age(or months)are in day-care centers many hours at days without love from his parents


Teacher's motto, "all you need is love".
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aprilshowers
Monday, September 22, 2008, 5:09pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Warrior (I think)
Spring: Growth, Peace.
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Location: Wisconsin
Age: 59
Quoted from goro1
Hello - this is my first post although I've been perusing these forums for almost 2 months now.  Aprilshowers I wanted to say I'm glad you stuck to the diet and everything went well at your dad's b-day party.  I think each person has their own timing in deciding to do things.  When my mom came from Europe in February of this year to visit she had told me about the BTD (I had been cooking bulghur [cracked wheat] dish and she warned me that wasn't good for our blood type [both O-]) and I totally dismissed her. Then my 11-year old niece in the beginning of August had been visiting my family in Europe and my mom had lent her the BTD book and she sent me an email about the different types of fruit that she was supposed to be eating and such and I thought maybe I should check out this diet.  I've never been one to diet - don't like the idea of restriction - but IMO this isn't so much a diet as a change in lifestyle.  I haven't totally conformed to the portion sizes but focused more on getting rid of all the avoids especially wheat and corn.  And I'm happy to say that my daily bloated gas/pain feeling is for the most part gone and I'm down 12 pounds in seven weeks (was 218 when I started and 5'5" so plenty to go but am in no big rush).  My point being that there still may be hope in converting/educating your family/friends, but if they are not accepting/willing then don't be frustrated/insulted.  You know you are doing your body good and that is what is important!  And if you can get them to be open to the prospect of doing something better for their body great, if not so be it.


Hello goro1 and welcome to the forums and the BTD!  I stayed in the background for quite awhile before I jumped in and started posting.  Everyone is very helpful and quite friendly here - all this good eating going on has so many benefits!

My mom and sister are both confirmed Os and actually that sister has been eating as an O for many years.  At that time I was the one not ready to hear about this "diet".  Now all these years later I have totally embraced it and can see the benefits.  My mom too has embraced eating for her type O and although giving up wheat and dairy are hard for her, she can't deny how well she feels.

I needed the reminder from you, thank you so much, about how timing is different for everyone. I'd conveniently forgotten all about how long it took me to come around to this way of eating.  It took a major health problem to wake me up.  So now that I have it figured out I just expect everyone to jump on board with me!


Type II diabetic following BTD for Type A secretor for diabetics.

We are what we repeatedly do.
- Aristotle

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Lola
Tuesday, September 23, 2008, 1:49am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1; L (a-b-); (se); PROP-T; NN
Sa Bon Nim
Admin & Columnist
Posts: 51,169
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Location: ''eternal spring'' Cuernavaca - Mex.
Age: 57
goro!
great results you ve had!
keep up the good work! including you SUE!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  Learning to be an A in an O world

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