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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  Kefir/Buttermilk
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Kefir/Buttermilk  This thread currently has 470 views. Print Print Thread
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italybound
Tuesday, May 6, 2008, 4:11pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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What's the dif? They taste the same to me. Dictionary.com is vague about what is added to make buttermilk, but mentions 2 specific bacteria strains (Streptococcus and Lactobacillus) have been added.



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Lloyd
Wednesday, May 7, 2008, 12:06am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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The streptococcus and lactobacillus strains are the strains that make up the 'probiotic' class. When you see a probiotic like S. thermophilus, the S stands for streptococcus (there ar many), similarly L. acidophilus is one of the lactobacillus strains.


Quoted from Wikipedia
Buttermilk is a fermented dairy product produced from cow's milk with a characteristically sour taste. The product is made in one of two ways. Originally, buttermilk was the liquid left over from churning butter from cream. Today, this is called traditional buttermilk. Buttermilk also refers to cultured buttermilk, a product where lactic acid bacteria have been added to milk.[1]...


...The Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) comprise a clade of Gram positive, low-GC, acid tolerant, non-sporulating, non-respiring rod or cocci that are associated by their common metabolic and physiological characteristics. These bacteria, usually found in decomposing plants and lactic products produce lactic acid as the major metabolic endproduct of carbohydrate fermentation. This trait has historically linked LAB with food fermentations as acidification inhibits the growth of spoilage agents. Proteinaceous bacteriocins are produced by several LAB strains and provide an additional hurdle for spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms. Furthermore, lactic acid and other metabolic products contribute to the organoleptic and textural profile of a food item. The industrial importance of the LAB is further evidenced by their generally regarded as safe (GRAS) status, due to their ubiquitous appearance in food and their contribution to the healthy microflora of human mucosal surfaces. The genera that comprise the LAB are at its core Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus, and Streptococcus as well as the more peripheral Aerococcus, Carnobacterium, Enterococcus, Oenococcus, Teragenococcus, Vagococcus, and Weisella; these belong to the order Lactobacillales....


...Kefir (alternately keefir, kephir, kewra, talai, mudu kekiya, milkkefir, b˙lgaros) is a fermented milk drink that originated in the Caucasus region. It is prepared by inoculating cow, goat, or sheep's milk with kefir grains...  ...Kefir grains are a combination of bacteria and yeasts in a matrix of proteins, lipids, and sugars. This symbiotic matrix forms grains that resemble cauliflower. Today, kefir is becoming increasingly popular due to new research into its health benefits. Many different bacteria and yeasts are found in the kefir grains, which are a complex and highly variable community of micro-organisms.[2]

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italybound
Wednesday, May 7, 2008, 4:53pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
Posts: 9,163
Location: Near St. Louis
Age: 58
so if I'm that right, yes, they are different, in a pretty big way............. yeah?



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Henriette Bsec
Wednesday, May 7, 2008, 6:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from italybound
so if I'm that right, yes, they are different, in a pretty big way............. yeah?


yep  
Kefir feels like medicin to me - while buttermilk just feel like food  


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italybound
Wednesday, May 7, 2008, 6:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
Posts: 9,163
Location: Near St. Louis
Age: 58
Quoted from Henriette Bsec
yep  
Kefir feels like medicin to me - while buttermilk just feel like food  


thanks HB   and thanks to you too Lloyd!!  



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