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Dr D's Bread Blog  This thread currently has 2,116 views. Print Print Thread
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raymond1905
Monday, July 9, 2007, 1:06am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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For some reason I can't get audio on the blog that talks about making bread in a cast iron oven...can somebody please send me the directions and information?  The bread looked excellent!

Rachel
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md
Monday, July 9, 2007, 1:34am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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You can do a google search for "Jim Lahey's No Knead Bread", and you will find the instructions.

Mary


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For not every food is good for everyone, nor is everything suited to every taste.



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raymond1905
Monday, July 9, 2007, 1:55am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Thanks, I'll do that.  Will I have to modify?  I'm new to cooking with Spelt flour
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md
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Quoted from raymond1905
Thanks, I'll do that.  Will I have to modify?  I'm new to cooking with Spelt flour


I haven't tried the recipe, so I don't know about modifying.  Sorry!


Sirach 37:27
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Rachel--working with spelt flour is a bit different from working with 'regular' wheat flour. Spelt does not have nearly as much gluten as wheat. (Gluten is the elastic stuff that makes it possible for bread to rise.) Actually that makes spelt a good flour for a no-knead bread recipe. Kneading doughs with low gluten makes for a flat, tough loaf; no-knead makes a nice tender loaf. It might not be as light and airy as you're used to with commercial storebought bread, but the taste difference more than makes up for that!

I would suggest following the recipe exactly the first time around. If your initial results are less than thrilling, experimentation is the key. If you are using whole-grain spelt flour, you might need a little more liquid--whole-grain flours tend to soak up a lot of water as the dough rises. Dr. D said he found using a bit more yeast worked much better. Play around with the recipe and see what works for you. If you get a really spectacular loaf, please share the recipe modification with us!


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ISA-MANUELA
Monday, July 9, 2007, 6:34pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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ahem...a little question of mine....so do you think that let rising  the spelt dough for an hour or two isn't enough and you are in need of more dried yeast than described, for example if you are using about 500 or more grams of speltflour..........if not...it's just not rising as it should ..
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Monika
Tuesday, July 10, 2007, 11:33am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Is instant yeast  (called for in this recipe) same as active dry yeast?  For some reason 1/4 tsp of yeast to 3 C flour sounds like is not enough. Has anyone tried this recipe and have used the dried active yeast?
TIA


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Tuesday, July 10, 2007, 11:42am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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My spelt bread [500gr] does not rise if there is less than 2, 1/2 tsp of active dry yeast.
Have experimented with 1 1/2, 2 tsp with poor result.

alek




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Tuesday, July 10, 2007, 2:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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How would one substitute oat flour for this recipe? would you use more yeast and add some flax meal to get it to rise and bind, respectively? also how about rye flour? thanks



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Quoted from lola
experimenting is the only way to find out.......


oh surely someone knows.......    anyone??



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TypeOSecretor
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Quoted from raymond1905
For some reason I can't get audio on the blog that talks about making bread in a cast iron oven...can somebody please send me the directions and information?  The bread looked excellent!

Rachel


I have dial-up Internet service.  My videos will also often cut out the video and audio.  It has something to do with transmission speeds.  I can't explain it very well, however, I am content with dial-up.
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Henriette Bsec
Wednesday, July 11, 2007, 3:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Well donīt use too much oatflour- or your bread wont rise- but will taste good though.
I never bake with more than 1:4 oat to white spelt.

I often bake with very little yeast and it works fine as long as you donīt overknead bread and let it rise ALL night.
As I posted other place I often use a tbl lemonjuice to help bread rise well.

I find it easier to bake with fresh yeast than dry yeast
- I would say I use peasize fresh yeast to 500 gram flour if I make slowrise bread
and maybe 10 gram fresh if it is quickbread that rise in 1-2 hours
- It does get drier fast than then slow rise bread.
Slowrise bread is healthier as well- especially whole grain breads. The long soaking /rising in a slightly acid enviroment( buttermilk-. sour dough or lemonjuice/water) - helps braking down fytin in the wholegarin flour.

Funny the recipe doc posted is quite like the one I use
- But I have never baked bread in a hot dutch oven... so Iīll try that now.


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ohh, i'm so glad this thread popped up.......reminded me my bread is ready to bake.
will post how it turns out.  





Revision History (2 edits)
pkarmeier  -  Wednesday, July 11, 2007, 6:48pm
pkarmeier  -  Wednesday, July 11, 2007, 6:47pm
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  don't know what happened, but my dough is runny.......it just kinda ran all over my counter for about a foot. maybe I need to add more flour? question on the water amount........it says 1-5/8 C water......I used one cup and then 5 oz.   Is that correct?



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Quoted from Henriette_Bsec

Funny the recipe doc posted is quite like the one I use
- But I have never baked bread in a hot dutch oven... so Iīll try that now.



Henriette - Your tips always sound so helpful.  I haven't bought a Dutch oven (yet).   What do you use to bake your bread in  - what kind of pan and what temperature after  letting it raise overnight ?  Do you let it raise in the pan you're going to bake it in or do you put it in the baking pan the next day?

Italybound -  I have had varying success with different brands of spelt flours.  I have super success with Berlin Bakery white spelt and pretty good success with VitaSpelt white.  Our health food store used to carry a brand of white spelt - I don't know the origin - and it took tons of flour to try to begin to make the dough form.  Maybe you want to try another brand of flour.  I don't have any experience mixing the flours.
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Quoted from TypeOSecretor
Italybound -  I have had varying success with different brands of spelt flours.  I have super success with Berlin Bakery white spelt and pretty good success with VitaSpelt white.  Our health food store used to carry a brand of white spelt - I don't know the origin - and it took tons of flour to try to begin to make the dough form.  Maybe you want to try another brand of flour.  I don't have any experience mixing the flours.


Maybe the FLOUR is the prob as you say........got it out of the bulk bin.......will look for some other next time and add more flour for now.  I have had no trouble cooking or baking w/ it before..........just strange.  




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When I bake rather soft doughs like the above mention recipe I normally let it rise in the breadpan
-it is made of steel ( I think ?)- need plenty ghee no to stick.....

When I bake firmer breads with 2 risings - I let it rise in the bowl- push carefully some of the air out - and form it to a freestanding bread on a baking tray - let it raise another 1 hour or so- depending if it is low yeast or moderate yeast bread. Low yeast breads need longer rising- but never let it overrise or it will be too flat.

I preheat oven to 485 F - when I put bread in I reduce to 400 f
- I find the more wholegrain flour - the lower and longer bread need to bake.

Type O - it is very true that spelt flour differs a lot.
At the moment I have a wholemeal spelt flour that is sooo fine that it looks like medium brown ordinary flour.
It makes good bread though.

I mixed my dough tonigh:
I used
1 cup wholegrain speltflour
2 cups  white spelt flour

and 1 and 1/2 a cup water.

Dough looks fine to me.- but Iīll tell you tomorrow how it went.
Need to sleep now


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Monika
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Italybound- My dough also turned out VEEERy runny. I could not fold the dough to form the bread, so I added extra white splet flour (maybe about 1 cup). The bread did not turn out right, it only grew to 1 inch and the texture was not right  Since I don't eat grains, I did not try it, but my DH said it was not too bad. Next time I will try it with 1 cup of water and let's see what happens. It was very humid last night, I guess this might made the dough even more runny.


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Quoted from Monika
Italybound- My dough also turned out VEEERy runny. I could not fold the dough to form the bread, so I added extra white splet flour (maybe about 1 cup). The bread did not turn out right, it only grew to 1 inch and the texture was not right ...my DH said it was not too bad. Next time I will try it with 1 cup of water


sounds exactly like my bread........it doesnt taste bad tho.......I'll try less water next time too. funny.........my mom used to make a cake that used a lot of water......turned out great for her every time..........always flopped for me........maybe the dif in oven temp and altitude?



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Ok my bread tuned out great.
YES the dough was runny- I just put a bit of oat flour on my hands and scooped it down in the hot dutch oven- was really more a round lump than shaped as a bread.
Baked it as it said.
It is dense with large holes just like the bread I had in France - in the country -artisan style I think it is called.
Iīm glad I didnīt add more flour.
But I DID use part wholegrain spelt flour and it soaks more water than white...

Next time I think Iīll use part yoghurt/buttermilk or maybe lemonjuice in water- I like my bread to be a bit tart.



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Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
YES the dough was runny- I just put a bit of oat flour on my hands and scooped it down in the hot dutch oven- was really more a round lump than shaped as a bread.


My dough was so runny, there was no hand scooping it into anything until I added more flour.        The taste was okay, but it was only about 1-1/2" thick and Rich asked what he was supposed to do w/ that piece of iron on the counter.   Nuff said.  



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Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
Ok my bread tuned out great.
YES the dough was runny- I just put a bit of oat flour on my hands and scooped it down in the hot dutch oven- was really more a round lump than shaped as a bread.
Baked it as it said.
It is dense with large holes just like the bread I had in France - in the country -artisan style I think it is called.
Iīm glad I didnīt add more flour.
But I DID use part wholegrain spelt flour and it soaks more water than white...

Next time I think Iīll use part yoghurt/buttermilk or maybe lemonjuice in water- I like my bread to be a bit tart.


Sounds good.  How much yeast and salt did you use?  What brand of Dutch oven do you have and what kind of material is it made from?  I've been looking at several types, including All Clad's stainless so I wouldn't have to lift 40 pounds.


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I used 1,5 tsp fine seasalt
and about 5 grams fresh yeast ( very little) look her for substitutes:
http://www.foodsubs.com/LeavenYeast.html
my dutch oven is an old finnish produce-
made from bare cast iron- looks very much like this one:
http://www.amazon.com/Lodge-5-Quart-Cast-Iron-Dutch/dp/B00004S9HE
I do have a very good Le Creuset one as well
- but I had a feeling it was not big enough so I used the big "finnish oven instead )

I use both a lot  for stwes and creamy soups.

Donīt get a stainless if it has to work it has to be cast iron- maybe with enameled like the Le Creuset ones- they are really the money worth.
Mine is more than 30 years old and still working.
I plan to get another one soon- but it cost 100 dollars so.....


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Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
Donīt get a stainless if it has to work it has to be cast iron-


maybe that's why mine didnt bake up so well,,,,,,,,,,,,used a stainless steel pot, but that was the only thing I had.  



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Quoted from pkarmeier


maybe that's why mine didnt bake up so well,,,,,,,,,,,,used a stainless steel pot, but that was the only thing I had.  


I donīt think it will heat well enough  

I would have taken a picture of my pretty bread but Emma has the camera on her holiday.


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I had a doctor's appointment and decided to mix a batch of bread before I left (3 cups flour, 1/4 tsp. yeast, 1 1/4 tsp. salt).  I have an All Clad stainless stock pot.  I called and found out it can go up to 500 degrees in the oven, including the lid.  The sides are not as thick as the bottom (or their Dutch oven), so I decided to try it.  I won't be greasing the pot, so we'll see what happens.

I used Berlin Bakery white spelt flour.    I've used it before.  I knew it was so alive -- I can feel it growing when I've kneaded it after just a few minutes.  I knew by the time I got home that it would have bubbles.  I mixed it at 10:30 AM.  Sure enough by the time I got home at 3:30 PM there were bubbles.  I was afraid it would overgrow, but I looked at some more N.Y. Times pictures and there were masses more bubbles.  It is now 9PM and I think I will start the 15 minute rolling in a few minutes - which is a little less than 12 hours.   It has more than doubled its volume.

I will let you know tomorrow how it comes out.

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Lola
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good luck!


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Thanks Lola.

Italybound, I now know what you mean by it running all over the counter.  I thought I would lose it (the dough), but I think I read that when folding it for the final rise, to just barely touch it.  I just barely touched it and it folded, so I'll hope for the best.

It's supposed to be quite hot tomorrow, so I want to run the oven tonight while it's still a little cool.

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I've noticed that white spelt flour uses a lot less liquid than all purpose flour to achieve a similar consistency of bread dough.

I've had really good experiences with using whole spelt flour in place of whole wheat flour in bread recipes. The nuttiness is wonderful and it has more structure.

Spelt bread tends to get a lot of smaller air pockets (more like a sponge) than the large ones in wheat breads.

The recipe that Dr. D modeled gets big pockets because of the wetness of the dough. Its a lot like a ciabatta bread dough.

The thickness of the cast iron pot and its ability to retain a constant high temperature seems pretty essential to attaining a good oven spring in the bread and great crust.


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I'm happy to report that my bread turned out beautifully.  My pot was 10 3/4" in diameter, so the bread was only about 2" high.  I may look around for a skinnier, taller pot.  
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well done!


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Quoted from TypeOSecretor
I'm happy to report that my bread turned out beautifully.  My pot was 10 3/4" in diameter, so the bread was only about 2" high.  I may look around for a skinnier, taller pot.  

Or...you could make a double batch.  


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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The 2nd bread I made was even better- I substituted  1/2 a cup of water with yoghurt.
I think a bit of lemonjuice could give the same tangy flavour.
I redused the temperature a bit- felt my bread just got abit too brown.
But still nice french style bread.



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my spicy speltbread is never like that ........muchmore compact....but yummy in taste ...will give a try since a looong time to do that with riceflour....but didn't found any since...here in Zürich .......
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Quoted from outdoordrea

Or...you could make a double batch.  



Good idea.  I may try it some time, but I think I would have to make two separate bowls - then combine them in the hot pot at the end  or they might not rise properly.  May try the lemon juice too some time.  I still have leftover bread.
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Made my first batch and I like it because it's something I can sink my O teeth into (I hate the light fluffy bread)....put some virgin olive oil on top of a slice and I was in heaven...very easy to make...two thumbs up


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Drea
Monday, July 16, 2007, 12:47am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I'm waiting on my cast iron pot to be delivered. Then I'm making up a batch of my own.


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TypeOSecretor
Monday, July 16, 2007, 2:41am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Tonight I made a small open-face sandwich:  homemade mayonnaise flavored with a little granulated garlic and some sliced organic baby grape tomatoes.  It was wonderful.  Then on another I added a thin slice of mozzarella cheese.  

Henriette - your bread really must have been beautiful if you wanted to take a picture.  Maybe some day when your camera is back you will post a picture.
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zola
Monday, July 16, 2007, 7:39am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Maybe with all this BTD bread baking people will have extra loaves to share and introduce others to tasty BTD compliant foods.

It would be great to have a loaf of this in the freezer at work and then....Voila! tasty compliant snack always at arm's reach!


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geminisue
Monday, July 16, 2007, 10:41am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Make a double batch---when watching video didn't he put two or three in the same dutch oven? Or did my eyes miss something?
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Quoted Text
didn't he put two or three in the same dutch oven?

he put one in each DO, only.


Mike!
thumbs up to you!!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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TypeOSecretor
Wednesday, July 18, 2007, 11:27am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I bought a new spelt cookbook a few months ago ("Spelt Healthy").  It had a recipe for Italian Biga/Dough.  It is similar to Dr. D's bread, except it is not cooked in the pot and the biga is made in two steps.  The fermentation time was less than the No-Knead bread.  I made half a recipe and produced 4 fairly large rolls.  Some people preferred the pot method because it was easier.  Anyhow, my bread turned out pretty yummy.

For those whose No-Knead bread didn't turn out so well, here is a link for making biga and the theory behind it.  Evidently the biga should not exceed 77 degrees or it will fail - so those in hotter areas would need to take that into consideration.   http://www.theartisan.net/Direct_Sponge_and_Biga.htm
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Lola
Wednesday, July 18, 2007, 5:50pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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yes, great book!
met Marsha at the conference!

great link TOS, thanks!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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Drea
Thursday, July 19, 2007, 2:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
Next time I think Iīll use part yoghurt/buttermilk or maybe lemonjuice in water- I like my bread to be a bit tart.


I, too, prefer tart bread. How much lemon juice would you say? My cast iron DO is on the way...


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Lola
Thursday, July 19, 2007, 10:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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1 tsp. lemon juice is fine I think.


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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honeybee
Friday, July 20, 2007, 3:23am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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henriette I like your yogurt bead idea,
I tried a loaf of 1 cup millet meal, 2 cups white spelt and a few linseeds for the outside of loaf. It had an excellent flavour and crust, but it was only an inch high, may have over watered it because i was wary that millet likes to soak up the liquids..i used salt / yeast as rec. but about 1 and half cups of water.
(am keen to try again soon..with yogurt and more linseeds i think.)
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Henriette Bsec
Friday, July 20, 2007, 8:41am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Millet doesnīt raise- that is why your bread was so low.

I use 1 tbl lemonjuice when I bake for my O but 1 tsp might be enough.
I just guess that my scandinavian background with plenty of sourdough bread makes me prefer sligtly tart breads- never cared for the sweet breads remember the first time I had a american bread I thought it was cake

Yes baking with biga is great makes really yummi breads.

BTW I found the rest of the bread I made the 14th of july with a bit of youghurt
and it was almost not dry- we did use it for french toast- but it really was quite moist still.


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Drea
Friday, July 20, 2007, 2:21pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
BTW I found the rest of the bread I made the 14th of july with a bit of youghurt
and it was almost not dry- we did use it for french toast- but it really was quite moist still.


How much yogurt do you use for one loaf of dutch oven bread? Is lemon juice also used in the same recipe? I don't think I've ever made bread, so really have no experience here.


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Brighid45
Friday, July 20, 2007, 2:40pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Here's a link to an article about ancient Egyptians making bread in pots:

http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~semitic/hsm/GizaBuiltEgypt.htm

In an old Cooks Illustrated I found an article on dutch ovens and they rated All-Clad the best, mainly because it didn't weigh as much as the runner-up (Le Creuset). After September I'm hoping to get my hands on a good dutch oven--they are so versatile and can be used for many recipes.

About adding non-gluten flours to your dough--use a light hand or your bread will not rise much. The low gluten in the spelt or emmer flour is what creates the structure that allows the bread to rise. If you add in too much GF flour, you're weighing down that structure until it collapses. Adding flaxseed will help to some degree, but imo you're better off using GF flours mainly for flavor. They do make good quickbreads, so keep them for muffins, banana or zucchini bread, and so on.


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Brighid -
Fascinating link.  Now I wonder if that clay pot I haven't used in decades can be used to make this bread.  I have evidently disposed of my recipe books.  I don't remember which is the top or the bottom.  I don't remember the maximum temperature.  I only remember I had to soak the top or the bottom in water before using.  I'll have to search.
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susanh
Friday, July 20, 2007, 11:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I have a couple of clay pots that I use often, but only for meat and vegetables. Before BTD I used them for chicken, which they do absolutely beautifully - very moist result. You need to soak the whole thing, top and bottom, for about ten minutes every time. I do that while I prepare the vegetables. The temperature range given in my book of instructions is 225-250 Celsius/ 425-480 Fahrenheit. It gives a couple of sweet recipes - one for apple strudel, which involves lining the base with aluminium foil - don't like the sound of that. Perhaps baking paper would do.
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susanh
Saturday, July 21, 2007, 2:14am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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BTW The instructions for my clay pots say that you are supposed to put them into a cold oven and bring up to heat. I don't know what that would do to bread.
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geminisue
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Do you need to soak your pots and lids first? Susan if you put the clay pots and lids in the cold oven and turned the stove to 480 like your pots can take , while your heating the oven, you could put the bread into the hot pots as recommended, part of the time covered and part of the time uncovered. Right?  I think you would have to increase both times a little, for variance, in temperature.  ???

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Quoted from susanh
BTW The instructions for my clay pots say that you are supposed to put them into a cold oven and bring up to heat. I don't know what that would do to bread.


if I remember right, the instructions call for you to put the pot in the oven when you first turn it on and let the pot warm w/ the oven to 350 ( I believe)...........seems it would be the same????



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TypeOSecretor
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This site gave me a few ideas:  http://www.romertopfonline.com/

I think I definitely read that it is to go in a cold oven (ingredients included) because sudden temperature changes can crack the pot (like dropping the colder bread in).  Unfortunately my pot has a glazed bottom (the Romertopf is not glazed) - I don't remember if I soaked the glazed bottom or not.  It has a German name stamped on it, but I can't find it online.  

I may try it some day, soaking the top, letting the bread have its final raise inside the clay pot,, putting it in a cold oven, then bringing the temperature up to 480 degrees, and removing the top for the final 30 minutes.   If my pot were not glazed, I would soak both top and bottom.  I don't remember what I did.
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Drea
Monday, July 23, 2007, 12:11am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Where are people getting their instant yeast? I went to four stores looking for this and no one in the greater Boulder area sells it.


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Monday, July 23, 2007, 12:35am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I just used regular baking yeast... or active dry yeast... worked just fine...


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Drea
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Quoted from Kristin
I just used regular baking yeast... or active dry yeast... worked just fine...


Thanks Kristin!  


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Quoted from outdoordrea
Where are people getting their instant yeast?.


is this the same as quick rise yeast (powder)?



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Drea
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Quoted from Kristin
I just used regular baking yeast... or active dry yeast... worked just fine...


Kristin, did you add the active dry yeast to the dry ingredients and follow the bread recipe posted? Or did you add it to warm water, then add to the bread recipe?


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Uh..... can't remember...   :


But my usual pattern is to follow a recipe as written the first time around, and then to alter it later if needed based on results. So I think I just added it to the dry ingredients rather than dissolving the yeast in the warm water first.


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Quoted from pkarmeier


is this the same as quick rise yeast (powder)?


To my knowledge, there are only 2 types of baking yeast, the dried granules and moist pressed cakes. The cake yeast is generally used only in commercial baking as it has a short shelf life (about a week or so in the refrigerator) but commercial bakers like it as it produces more consistent results... has more gassing power and can be activated at a wider range of temperatures (according to my bread book).

So I would think that any yeast in a powder form would be the same.... as they are all from the same species Sacharomyces cerevisiae.


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Drea
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Quoted from pkarmeier


is this the same as quick rise yeast (powder)?


Ah ha! Lookie what I found: http://whatscookingamerica.net/Bread/yeastbreadtip.htm

"Active Dry Yeast

1 cake of compressed yeast equals 1 package of active dry yeast. 1 package active dry yeast equals about 2 1/4 teaspoons.

Active dry yeast has a larger particle size than Instant Active Dry Yeast, making it necessary to proof, usually water, before using. Recommended water temperatures will vary by manufacturer between 100 - 115 degrees F as measured with an Instant Read Thermometer.

Active dry yeast will keep well beyond its expiration date printed on the package for 1 year if unopened at room temperature. It will keep longer if frozen. Place directly in the freezer in its vacuum sealed container. If frozen, you can use it directly without thawing.

If opened, active dry yeast will keep 3 months in the refrigerator and 6 months in the freezer. Keep yeast in its original container with the opened flap folded closed in a resealable plastic bag. Stored at room temperature and opened without a protective outer container it loses its power at about 10% per month.

Instant Yeast -  Also known as: Fast Rising, Rapid Rise, or Bread Machine Yeast

1 envelope or packet of Active Dry Yeast, Instant Yeast, Rapid Rise Yeast, Fast Rising Yeast or Bread Machine Yeast weighs 1/4 ounce or 7 grams which equals 2 1/4 teaspoons (11 ml).

Instant or Rapid Rise Yeast does not require warm liquid to be activated. This type of yeast has been genetically engineered from different strains of yeast to produce breads that can be made with only one rising. Rapid rise yeast is also more finely granulated than active dry yeast, so it does not need to be dissolved in water first. It can be added directly to the dry ingredients, making it a popular choice for use with bread machines.

Instant active or RapidRise yeast is added to the dry ingredients. Then, the liquid portion of the recipe's ingredients, warmed to 120 – 130 degrees F, as measured with an Instant Read Thermometer, are added to make a dough.

Instant yeast will keep a year at room temperature if unopened. If opened, it will keep 3 months in the refrigerator and 6 months in the freezer. Keep yeast in its original container with the opened flap folded closed in a resealable plastic bag."


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Kristin
Monday, July 23, 2007, 2:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Hey... great info Drea, thanks!!  


A little scary that the instant yeast is genetically modified, though...    But good to know in any case.


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Henriette Bsec
Monday, July 23, 2007, 3:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Kristin


To my knowledge, there are only 2 types of baking yeast, the dried granules and moist pressed cakes. The cake yeast is generally used only in commercial baking as it has a short shelf life (about a week or so in the refrigerator) but commercial bakers like it as it produces more consistent results... has more gassing power and can be activated at a wider range of temperatures (according to my bread book).


That must be why I never have problems with my bread I only use the moist ckae ones!
It is far more common here and can be kept in fridge for 3 weeks or so.


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Quoted from Kristin
A little scary that the instant yeast is genetically modified, though...  


no kidding!! my face got a funny look on it when I read that!!         that's what I used in my bread..........will use a dif flour next time.



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In case anyone is interested, I went to the library today and checked out a book for clay cooking that had several bread recipes in it.   There are similar recipes listed online with links listed below.

I also found out online that since my clay cooker has a glazed bottom, it is only soaked the first time I use it for 30 minutes.  Since I haven't used this in at least 30 or 40 years, I think I'll soak it and try a loaf of bread some day.  I'll probably use the recipe provided by Dr. D.  

Here are some links online for clay pot bread if someone wants to try  - :
http://www.claypot.com/merchant2/Recipe.php?recipe=11
http://www.claypot.com/merchant2/Recipe.php?recipe=12

Also, I think someone wanted a rye bread recipe.  This link may show you how to adapt it (changing to compliant ingredients - and maybe using lemon juice and water or soymilk instead of buttermilk if you can't have it):
http://www.claypot.com/merchant2/Recipe.php?recipe=14

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thanks!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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