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Dr D's Bread Blog  This thread currently has 2,167 views. Print Print Thread
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Brighid45
Friday, July 20, 2007, 2:40pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Here's a link to an article about ancient Egyptians making bread in pots:

http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~semitic/hsm/GizaBuiltEgypt.htm

In an old Cooks Illustrated I found an article on dutch ovens and they rated All-Clad the best, mainly because it didn't weigh as much as the runner-up (Le Creuset). After September I'm hoping to get my hands on a good dutch oven--they are so versatile and can be used for many recipes.

About adding non-gluten flours to your dough--use a light hand or your bread will not rise much. The low gluten in the spelt or emmer flour is what creates the structure that allows the bread to rise. If you add in too much GF flour, you're weighing down that structure until it collapses. Adding flaxseed will help to some degree, but imo you're better off using GF flours mainly for flavor. They do make good quickbreads, so keep them for muffins, banana or zucchini bread, and so on.


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TypeOSecretor
Friday, July 20, 2007, 4:36pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Brighid -
Fascinating link.  Now I wonder if that clay pot I haven't used in decades can be used to make this bread.  I have evidently disposed of my recipe books.  I don't remember which is the top or the bottom.  I don't remember the maximum temperature.  I only remember I had to soak the top or the bottom in water before using.  I'll have to search.
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susanh
Friday, July 20, 2007, 11:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I have a couple of clay pots that I use often, but only for meat and vegetables. Before BTD I used them for chicken, which they do absolutely beautifully - very moist result. You need to soak the whole thing, top and bottom, for about ten minutes every time. I do that while I prepare the vegetables. The temperature range given in my book of instructions is 225-250 Celsius/ 425-480 Fahrenheit. It gives a couple of sweet recipes - one for apple strudel, which involves lining the base with aluminium foil - don't like the sound of that. Perhaps baking paper would do.
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susanh
Saturday, July 21, 2007, 2:14am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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BTW The instructions for my clay pots say that you are supposed to put them into a cold oven and bring up to heat. I don't know what that would do to bread.
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geminisue
Saturday, July 21, 2007, 3:01am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Do you need to soak your pots and lids first? Susan if you put the clay pots and lids in the cold oven and turned the stove to 480 like your pots can take , while your heating the oven, you could put the bread into the hot pots as recommended, part of the time covered and part of the time uncovered. Right?  I think you would have to increase both times a little, for variance, in temperature.  ???

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italybound
Saturday, July 21, 2007, 3:10am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from susanh
BTW The instructions for my clay pots say that you are supposed to put them into a cold oven and bring up to heat. I don't know what that would do to bread.


if I remember right, the instructions call for you to put the pot in the oven when you first turn it on and let the pot warm w/ the oven to 350 ( I believe)...........seems it would be the same????



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TypeOSecretor
Saturday, July 21, 2007, 3:35am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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This site gave me a few ideas:  http://www.romertopfonline.com/

I think I definitely read that it is to go in a cold oven (ingredients included) because sudden temperature changes can crack the pot (like dropping the colder bread in).  Unfortunately my pot has a glazed bottom (the Romertopf is not glazed) - I don't remember if I soaked the glazed bottom or not.  It has a German name stamped on it, but I can't find it online.  

I may try it some day, soaking the top, letting the bread have its final raise inside the clay pot,, putting it in a cold oven, then bringing the temperature up to 480 degrees, and removing the top for the final 30 minutes.   If my pot were not glazed, I would soak both top and bottom.  I don't remember what I did.
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Drea
Monday, July 23, 2007, 12:11am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Where are people getting their instant yeast? I went to four stores looking for this and no one in the greater Boulder area sells it.


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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Kristin
Monday, July 23, 2007, 12:35am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I just used regular baking yeast... or active dry yeast... worked just fine...


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Drea
Monday, July 23, 2007, 12:42am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Kristin
I just used regular baking yeast... or active dry yeast... worked just fine...


Thanks Kristin!  


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italybound
Monday, July 23, 2007, 1:22am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from outdoordrea
Where are people getting their instant yeast?.


is this the same as quick rise yeast (powder)?



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Drea
Monday, July 23, 2007, 1:09pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Kristin
I just used regular baking yeast... or active dry yeast... worked just fine...


Kristin, did you add the active dry yeast to the dry ingredients and follow the bread recipe posted? Or did you add it to warm water, then add to the bread recipe?


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.

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Kristin
Monday, July 23, 2007, 2:24pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Uh..... can't remember...   :


But my usual pattern is to follow a recipe as written the first time around, and then to alter it later if needed based on results. So I think I just added it to the dry ingredients rather than dissolving the yeast in the warm water first.


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Kristin
Monday, July 23, 2007, 2:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from pkarmeier


is this the same as quick rise yeast (powder)?


To my knowledge, there are only 2 types of baking yeast, the dried granules and moist pressed cakes. The cake yeast is generally used only in commercial baking as it has a short shelf life (about a week or so in the refrigerator) but commercial bakers like it as it produces more consistent results... has more gassing power and can be activated at a wider range of temperatures (according to my bread book).

So I would think that any yeast in a powder form would be the same.... as they are all from the same species Sacharomyces cerevisiae.


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Drea
Monday, July 23, 2007, 2:51pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from pkarmeier


is this the same as quick rise yeast (powder)?


Ah ha! Lookie what I found: http://whatscookingamerica.net/Bread/yeastbreadtip.htm

"Active Dry Yeast

1 cake of compressed yeast equals 1 package of active dry yeast. 1 package active dry yeast equals about 2 1/4 teaspoons.

Active dry yeast has a larger particle size than Instant Active Dry Yeast, making it necessary to proof, usually water, before using. Recommended water temperatures will vary by manufacturer between 100 - 115 degrees F as measured with an Instant Read Thermometer.

Active dry yeast will keep well beyond its expiration date printed on the package for 1 year if unopened at room temperature. It will keep longer if frozen. Place directly in the freezer in its vacuum sealed container. If frozen, you can use it directly without thawing.

If opened, active dry yeast will keep 3 months in the refrigerator and 6 months in the freezer. Keep yeast in its original container with the opened flap folded closed in a resealable plastic bag. Stored at room temperature and opened without a protective outer container it loses its power at about 10% per month.

Instant Yeast -  Also known as: Fast Rising, Rapid Rise, or Bread Machine Yeast

1 envelope or packet of Active Dry Yeast, Instant Yeast, Rapid Rise Yeast, Fast Rising Yeast or Bread Machine Yeast weighs 1/4 ounce or 7 grams which equals 2 1/4 teaspoons (11 ml).

Instant or Rapid Rise Yeast does not require warm liquid to be activated. This type of yeast has been genetically engineered from different strains of yeast to produce breads that can be made with only one rising. Rapid rise yeast is also more finely granulated than active dry yeast, so it does not need to be dissolved in water first. It can be added directly to the dry ingredients, making it a popular choice for use with bread machines.

Instant active or RapidRise yeast is added to the dry ingredients. Then, the liquid portion of the recipe's ingredients, warmed to 120 – 130 degrees F, as measured with an Instant Read Thermometer, are added to make a dough.

Instant yeast will keep a year at room temperature if unopened. If opened, it will keep 3 months in the refrigerator and 6 months in the freezer. Keep yeast in its original container with the opened flap folded closed in a resealable plastic bag."


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Kristin
Monday, July 23, 2007, 2:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Hey... great info Drea, thanks!!  


A little scary that the instant yeast is genetically modified, though...    But good to know in any case.


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Henriette Bsec
Monday, July 23, 2007, 3:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Kristin


To my knowledge, there are only 2 types of baking yeast, the dried granules and moist pressed cakes. The cake yeast is generally used only in commercial baking as it has a short shelf life (about a week or so in the refrigerator) but commercial bakers like it as it produces more consistent results... has more gassing power and can be activated at a wider range of temperatures (according to my bread book).


That must be why I never have problems with my bread I only use the moist ckae ones!
It is far more common here and can be kept in fridge for 3 weeks or so.


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italybound
Monday, July 23, 2007, 4:39pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Kristin
A little scary that the instant yeast is genetically modified, though...  


no kidding!! my face got a funny look on it when I read that!!         that's what I used in my bread..........will use a dif flour next time.



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TypeOSecretor
Wednesday, July 25, 2007, 3:54am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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In case anyone is interested, I went to the library today and checked out a book for clay cooking that had several bread recipes in it.   There are similar recipes listed online with links listed below.

I also found out online that since my clay cooker has a glazed bottom, it is only soaked the first time I use it for 30 minutes.  Since I haven't used this in at least 30 or 40 years, I think I'll soak it and try a loaf of bread some day.  I'll probably use the recipe provided by Dr. D.  

Here are some links online for clay pot bread if someone wants to try  - :
http://www.claypot.com/merchant2/Recipe.php?recipe=11
http://www.claypot.com/merchant2/Recipe.php?recipe=12

Also, I think someone wanted a rye bread recipe.  This link may show you how to adapt it (changing to compliant ingredients - and maybe using lemon juice and water or soymilk instead of buttermilk if you can't have it):
http://www.claypot.com/merchant2/Recipe.php?recipe=14

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Lola
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thanks!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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