Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register


Main Forum Page  ♦   Latest Posts  ♦   Member Center  ♦   Search  ♦   Archives   ♦   Help   ♦   Log In/Out   ♦   Admins
Forum Login
Login Name: Create a new account
Password:     Forgot password

BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  A Safe Appetite Suppressant?
Users Browsing Forum
No Members and 12 Guests

A Safe Appetite Suppressant?  This thread currently has 3,243 views. Print Print Thread
4 Pages « 1 2 3 4 » All Recommend Thread
Lola
Sunday, December 17, 2006, 5:59am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1; L (a-b-); (se); PROP-T; NN
Sa Bon Nim
Admin & Columnist
Posts: 51,093
Gender: Female
Location: ''eternal spring'' Cuernavaca - Mex.
Age: 57
one slice of bread everyday seems like a lot of servings a week, to me.......think nonnies are allowed 0 to 3 servings a week, if I m not mistaken.


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
Logged
Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 25 - 90
Tina
Sunday, December 17, 2006, 6:04am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
You are right, but I have been eating one each morning.  I guess I'll try and cut a few days out...  
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 26 - 90
Tina
Sunday, December 17, 2006, 6:17am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
What can I eat instead to accompany my eggs and blueberries?
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 27 - 90
MyraBee
Sunday, December 17, 2006, 8:01am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1 Happy Hunter
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 443
Gender: Female
Location: Wichita, Kansas--USA
Age: 56
Quoted from Tina
What can I eat instead to accompany my eggs and blueberries?


How 'bout a nice steaming cup of Black Cocoa?

Love,

My.


"We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We are spiritual beings having a human experience." Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
http://www.stillspeaking.com

Revision History (1 edits)
MyraBee  -  Sunday, December 17, 2006, 8:08am
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 28 - 90
ISA-MANUELA
Sunday, December 17, 2006, 9:23am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
I know only one plant which is called* healiantus tuberosus* = topinambur,  which is taken as a natural appetitereducer...but I saw it wasn't ok for us, the AB's
but in ancient tradition it's taken furthermore for diabetics.
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 29 - 90
koahiatamadl
Sunday, December 17, 2006, 3:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh- Hunter ISTJ
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 568
Gender: Female
Location: Basel, CH
Age: 37
Quoted from Tina
What can I eat instead to accompany my eggs and blueberries?


Anything really - leftover veg from the night before?

It is very much a case of getting your head round the idea that grain is not needed for breakfast  or any other meal...and that breakfast need not include foods which you grew up to consider as breakfast...imho.

Once you have achieved that mental switch the question is no longer one of substitutes but one of more or less appealing combinations of food, which makes life a lot less complicated...  
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 30 - 90
Don
Sunday, December 17, 2006, 5:41pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh-, MN
Sam Dan
Posts: 7,189
Gender: Male
Location: North Alabama
Age: 58
Quoted from koahiatamadl
Anything really - leftover veg from the night before?

It is very much a case of getting your head round the idea that grain is not needed for breakfast  or any other meal...and that breakfast need not include foods which you grew up to consider as breakfast...imho.

Once you have achieved that mental switch the question is no longer one of substitutes but one of more or less appealing combinations of food, which makes life a lot less complicated...  

Nicely stated and I agree with you.



FIFHI; ISTP;
Started BTD 3/2002, with 2 O- secretor teenage sons
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 31 - 90
Laura P
Sunday, December 17, 2006, 6:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 2,206
Gender: Female
Location: Charleston, SC
Age: 33
ditto to both of you.  


I also would like to point out to you Tina, that you have been posting about this rice bread that you eat, and how it doesn't bother you and you eat it every morning and do well with it and feel it is needed. I have found with myself that when there is something it in that I have a hard time picturing being without..........that thing is often a problem



If there is no God, who pops up the next Kleenex?
Art Hoppe


Sometimes you don't know how great life is until you lose what you didn't know you had

Revision History (1 edits)
MyraBee  -  Sunday, December 17, 2006, 9:27pm
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 32 - 90
Melissa_J
Monday, December 18, 2006, 12:29am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Hunter
Sa Bon Nim
Administrator & Blogger
Posts: 5,045
Gender: Female
Location: Utah, USA
Age: 39
I like to eat brazilian collard greens for breakfast, with eggs.  Refried compliant beans are also nice now and then.  I like to take most any leftovers and scramble those up with a couple eggs, then add spices or salsa.


Type O+ blogger, secretor afterall. Gluten intolerant. With two gluten intolerant sons:  A+ Secretor 10 yo (also fructose intolerant and slightly egg allergic), and  O- 7yo.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 33 - 90
Alia Vo
Monday, December 18, 2006, 1:42am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
Posts: 3,640
Gender: Female
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Age: 43
Good quality seaweed is a powerhouse of nutrition and a good ABO-compliant snack.

It does seem to be satisfying when I add it to my meals.  I sometimes add a little amount of cut up wakame, nori, or kelp to my salads for its saltiness, flavor, and texture.  

Alia


Alia A. Vo
A Positive Secretor
Minneapolis, Minnesota
BTD Lifestyle Since 1999
John 17
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 34 - 90
Don
Monday, December 18, 2006, 4:09am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh-, MN
Sam Dan
Posts: 7,189
Gender: Male
Location: North Alabama
Age: 58
Quoted from outdoordrea
What kind of seaweed to you typically snack on?

I can buy kelp cut up into bite size pieces at a local asian grocery store and they make a convenient easy to eat snack. I am currently out of the kelp pieces and have been snacking on some wakame, which I think is a type of kelp.

I don't care to snack on dulse.


FIFHI; ISTP;
Started BTD 3/2002, with 2 O- secretor teenage sons
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 35 - 90
Laura P
Monday, December 18, 2006, 12:15pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 2,206
Gender: Female
Location: Charleston, SC
Age: 33
I am opposite, I love dulse and nori but am not a big fan of wakame or kelp, kombu is good cooked nice and soft in soups but only if cooked for a long time



If there is no God, who pops up the next Kleenex?
Art Hoppe


Sometimes you don't know how great life is until you lose what you didn't know you had
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 36 - 90
Henriette Bsec
Monday, December 18, 2006, 2:31pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

swamied nomad chameleon receptor worldview
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,620
Gender: Female
Location: Denmark
Age: 42
Quoted from John_McDonell_O+
MoDon,

I very much agree with your assessment of reindeer as being a very lean meat (most wild meat is too - moose, venison, seal, etc). However, we are talking about deriving energy (heat) from food, it ain't the protein but the fat that the mitochondria burns as fuel. I am certain that these people also ate huge portions of animal-fat to remain healthy in a cold environment. [Perhaps this was 'lost' or 'edited-out' as part of the filming process.]

It would be great if Henriette would plug-in to this discussion.

Mikeo, it's obvious from this selection of foods that environment (temperature) plays a very small role in selecting foods. Query: Since you live in Toronto, Canada and 'winterize' your car, should you also not get 'winterized'? Or, do you run on the same fuel (tropical fruits = summer gasoline) ... or fill your radiator the same, year round? The Aussie list of comfort-foods is for what-season .... a notion of one-size-fits-all, eh? Rather than blood types, is it OK for a one size-fits-all concept for different seasons?

John


Sorry John- a bit stressed so I did not see your comment.
Well I have to agree with John - IF there was no fat it was was edited out!!
From archeology ( that is my field) and from my knowledge of people in Greenland. people has ALWAYS craved fat in cold climate- they just know that you can not survive on a diet of lean meat( BUT strange enough fat AND protein is OK )
The marrow is taken out- kidneyfat is highly valued- as well as a brain (fatty)
The inuits in Greenland eats plenty of fat and stay rather slim ( they are sturdy - but not fat- if they keep to their trad. diet !).
The best threat is fat from seals, whales etc. BUT they would never trow away fat from reindeer or other rather lean land animals.
I am quite certain that people in different climates need different food- no matter their BT.
It is not wise to eat a lot of tropical fruits in a cold climate in wintertime -not for your body or your moneywallet


ENFP -naturalist, visual/spatial and musical/verbal/chatty Dane- Mother to DD Emma age 19,
0 rh- secr ( Hunter or Explorer )
Diamonds, superfoods, Neutral,*black dots, avoids

Revision History (1 edits)
MyraBee  -  Monday, December 18, 2006, 2:33pm
spelling stupid dane ;-D
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 37 - 90
Don
Monday, December 18, 2006, 3:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh-, MN
Sam Dan
Posts: 7,189
Gender: Male
Location: North Alabama
Age: 58
I never said the fat part wasn't important. I was just saying that there probably is nothing wrong with a high protein diet in the winter. If the the people living in the town in Russia, that I commented about, were eating mainly reindeer meat and it was fairly lean, then they must be getting a fair amount of protein in their diet. That was my main point.

Of course even with the high red meat protein diet they would also get a fair amount of fat too, which would be important for an energy source in cold temperatures.


FIFHI; ISTP;
Started BTD 3/2002, with 2 O- secretor teenage sons
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 38 - 90
Henriette Bsec
Monday, December 18, 2006, 4:51pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

swamied nomad chameleon receptor worldview
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,620
Gender: Female
Location: Denmark
Age: 42
Sorry- I only read Johns post...


ENFP -naturalist, visual/spatial and musical/verbal/chatty Dane- Mother to DD Emma age 19,
0 rh- secr ( Hunter or Explorer )
Diamonds, superfoods, Neutral,*black dots, avoids
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 39 - 90
Susana
Monday, December 18, 2006, 10:49pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1 Hunter 51%
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,445
Gender: Female
Location: Tenerife, Spain
Age: 51
I am still looking for reseach proving that too much protein is bad and of course, if it is, why?Also, how much is too much?

On the BBC they once had a documentary where they talked about several research that hade been carried out to determine what produces satiety.

The program concluded that the most satiating of carbs, fat, protein, was the protein.
It was more satiating than carbs and fat or fat alone and of fat and protein, it was the protein that satiated most.

it was a very well done documentary covering research carried in several countries from US to Finland.






Revision History (1 edits)
MyraBee  -  Monday, December 18, 2006, 10:59pm
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 40 - 90
Laura P
Tuesday, December 19, 2006, 1:39am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 2,206
Gender: Female
Location: Charleston, SC
Age: 33
if you just ate low fat protien and nothing eles all day that would be bad, otherwise, there is nothing wrong with a high protien diet as long as it is accompanied by a proper amount of fat



If there is no God, who pops up the next Kleenex?
Art Hoppe


Sometimes you don't know how great life is until you lose what you didn't know you had
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 41 - 90
resting
Tuesday, December 19, 2006, 2:00am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

probable non-sec
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,797
Gender: Male
Location: Timmins, Ontario, Canada
Age: 67
Hi Suzana,

perhaps you misunderstand or oversimplify just what protein is .... or maybe our minds run on different tracks ... protein are classified as 22 (or so) chemicals called amino acids.  That # usually does not include taurine because it acts unlike the rest.  Many meat proteins are composed of 46 groupings of 3 amino acids.

protein usage in the body depends on many things: a supply of amino acids, a capability to build protein from basics - amino acids and peptides (protein fragments); even the ability to break-down protein that is eaten into very small segments.

your wish for specific numbers is not real science.  MoDon was coached a few months back by a poster named Judi.  There was little doubt she was expert in biochemistry.  She said that excess protein was not considered neutral and eliminated as such, but that excess did damage.  She did however refrain from giving any number.

having such a number could easily be a false target

John


The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane. Marcus Aurelius

Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 42 - 90
Susana
Tuesday, December 19, 2006, 11:32am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1 Hunter 51%
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,445
Gender: Female
Location: Tenerife, Spain
Age: 51
I tend to simplify things for communication purposes and I guess many times I simplify so much that it is misleading. Also, I tend to participate in the forum in the evenings with my husband sitting beside me watching Spanish TV. I make comments in Spanish to what he is listening to and I am reading and writing in English. Sorry.

My previous post was:

1) Replying to the request that initiated this thread: Can anyone direct me to a safe appetite suppressant and did so following one of the issues that has been brought up also in the thread Protein being an appetite suppressor.

2) Tina in another thread mentions something in the lines of: because too much protein is not good, I take bread instead in the morning.

In all honesty, I am fed up with the comment that protein is bad for you without proper back up (Tina, I am not having a go at you but at the big shots who start the nonsense). I started my previous post in anger. Asking for the research that proves that protein is bad for you, and why is protein bad for you if so?

An example: Resting posted on post 42: MoDon was coached a few months back by a poster named Judi.  There was little doubt she was expert in biochemistry.  She said that excess protein was not considered neutral and eliminated as such, but that excess did damage. My question: What is damaged by excess protein? Will it be my brain, kidney, liver, heart, stomach, muscles, breath, pocket ? Con dont through the stone and hide the hand.

As to Restings quote on post 8, Excess protein just does not willingly leave the body unused, but it can putrefy and cause all kinds of havok in the GI tract.  How much is enough and WHEN is it enough ?????????? I have not seen any research that backs it up. According to Dr. D I have a gastric mechanism which can deal with the recommended amounts of protein efficiently.

I read in the November Issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, Low-carbohydrate-diet Score and the Risk of Coronary Heart Decease in Women.  The article is quite frustrating as they have to constantly refer to previous articles/research to direct their conclusions.

Having carried out worldwide research studies and created presentations for board of directors for mayor world multinationals I am well aware of how not only the creation of the research can be influenced for required results or out of ignorance but also how results can be manipulated.

In any case, research conclusions: Diets lower in carbohydrate and higher in protein and fat were not associated with an increased risk of coronary heart decease in this cohort of women. They also comment on how the research could not address other possible adverse consequences of a low carbohydrate diet in terms of a decline in renal function, but they mention that on a subgroup of the nurses health study dietary protein was not associated with a decline in a healthy renal function.

Also, they conclude from the study that: the increase of total fat that is common among women who follow low-carbohydrate diets would not be expected to increase the risk of coronary heart decease.  They have to refer to previous studies to say that: saturated and trans fats have been associated with an increased risk of coronary heart decease and polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats with decreased risk. Total dietary fat, however, has not been associated with a risk of coronary heart decease.

It is important to realize that when they mention saturated and trans fat, I have no clue as I have not followed up on their references, the proportion of trans vs. saturated fat used in the sample or, the source of the saturated fat: pork, beef (I do not know if it makes a difference) and, of course, our question, what blood types were represented in the sample? And, what role did the carbs consumed played in these resuls? Actually the article mentions that they found that: the direct relationship between glycemic load and coronary heart decease was much stronger than the association between carbohydrate and coronary heart decease.

A comment that can give a lead to MoDons Resting/protein fat: In our previous analyses, we found that a moderately high protein intake was significantly associated with a slightly reduced risk of coronary heart decease. In this study, however, only vegetable protein was associated with a significantly reduced risk So in terms of coronary heart decease risk and based on this study, the type of protein matters.

Having said all this, it is obvious that practically anything in too large amounts or exclusively is not the best for us.

Since we are on the BTD forum Dr. D gives a guideline as to the amount of protein we are meant to have. Since protein is a satiating ingredient, it is not easy, if one fills up on veggies, fruit, and protein to eat significantly above recommendations. He also recommends grass fed, low fat cuts of meat and poultry

I was interpreting that Tina was considering the guidelines Dr. D proposes as too much protein. I am saying that I have not been able to grab any research that proves so. Nor have I been able to find research that provides information solely on protein. I have not searched much in this area may be my next project.

In terms of seasonality, I find that I basically carry the same life year round. My environment does not allow me to make drastic changes. So I find that because I have to live an intense winter (including Christmas) and deal with lower temperatures I need to eat more and I do eat more fat but my muscles still require the same protein as the summer. So wouldnt I be harming my muscles if I reduced my protein in winter?

I hope I been not even more misleading  


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 43 - 90
shoulderblade
Tuesday, December 19, 2006, 3:50pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh -
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,092
Gender: Male
Location: Kitchener, ON.
Age: 65
Quoted from Susana
I am still looking for reseach proving that too much protein is bad and of course, if it is, why?Also, how much is too much?







This seems to be one of the great mysteries of modern nutrition. I have never seen any research or heard the opinion of any author on what is considered 'high protein' let alone how much is too much.

I suspect the reason behind this is cultural of some sort as protein is rather undervalued in the modern diet. It may also be more expensive ($). Generally the modern , vacant calorie, diet seems to me mostly fat and carbs with protein tagging along as a leftover.

Atkins may have something to say about this as his diet is severely low carb leaving you with protein and fat. Even he is attacked on the high fats side but no one mentions the proteins.

Mysterious.






Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 44 - 90
resting
Tuesday, December 19, 2006, 4:07pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

probable non-sec
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,797
Gender: Male
Location: Timmins, Ontario, Canada
Age: 67
Hi Suzana,

you have been true-to-form and are not at all misleading.  However, citing your references as a good reflection of biochemistry is problematic.  For instance, when the word 'protein' is used what is being referred to?  All foods are a blend of protein, fat, carbohydrates, water, minerals, etc  [Spirulina and chlorella  even though vegetables, have about twice the amount of protein as meat.  Eggs have the most-utilized protein of all common food.  Now there is the supplement mix of amino acids which totally bypasses regular protein digestion and is 100% utilized by the body (one is BioBuilde).]

Sufficiency of protein means what?  Because of proteins' large chemical structure, 'protein' is a fairly loose word representing thousands of types (and literally trillions of units) in a whole class of chemicals.  [Maybe you talk one Gr. 5 student named Cloe ... as if she means all.  Instead, there are millions of Gr. 5 students]  Proteins do numerous things within a body, for instance they are the backbone of all enzymes.  But heat above 105F will destroy all enzymes.  So all cooked meat has their enzymes destroyed.  We eat raw veggies, fruits and fermented foods because we need enzymes to survive.

John

I am not any kind of 'professional' in biochemistry, but I've read enough research papers to realize that there is always a language problem with specifics .... as a field of study expands, what was represented as being just one thing expands incredibly.  For example, you perceive fat only as saturated and unsaturated .... even the 'simple' world of fat has hundreds of specific types and play large roles in health.


The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane. Marcus Aurelius

Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 45 - 90
Susana
Tuesday, December 19, 2006, 10:21pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1 Hunter 51%
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,445
Gender: Female
Location: Tenerife, Spain
Age: 51
Quoted from Susana

A comment that can give a lead to MoDons Resting/protein fat: In our previous analyses, we found that a moderately high protein intake was significantly associated with a slightly reduced risk of coronary heart decease. In this study, however, only vegetable protein was associated with a significantly reduced risk So in terms of coronary heart decease risk and based on this study, the type of protein matters.


Well, I was the first one to use protein incorrectly. It could be (actually most probable) it is the difference in fats in vegetable vs. animal protein that affects the results or perhaps, it was the type of vegetable or animal protein that was given to the sample.

You guys are so true. Very little research is done to separate protein from fats and of course, the variety of protein, fats or for that matter, carbs. This is why I get so furious that experts say too much protein can damage your health. What are they talking about? Finding truth is hard enough to have to deal with all the wrong clues.

Resting, I guess I was using references to show one can argue one way or the other. Some say protein is bad some say it is good.  I would say most research deal with animal vs. vegetable at most and because they do not separate the fat issue, or specify the source, conclusions vary. Also the carbs added to the mixture can influence results significantly.

So, for the time being I try to go with BTD. Female intuition  

Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 46 - 90
Don
Tuesday, December 19, 2006, 11:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh-, MN
Sam Dan
Posts: 7,189
Gender: Male
Location: North Alabama
Age: 58
Quoted from Tina
How much protein is okay?

Have you tried eating what Dr. D recommends for a type O non-secretor both in terms of serving size and frequency? Did you try using the maximum serving size, particularly for breakfast? I think that eating the recommended amount of protein and keeping carbs relatively low at breakfast will help reduce your cravings.

Are you Rh + or -? Note that Rh- should eat more meat and fish meals per week per LR4YT.

I know you are concerned about the expense of the protein, but what is the cost of supplements to get you around eating properly for your blood/secretor type? Or worse what is the cost of health problems? You need to accept that who you are genetically, a type O non-secretor, requires you to eat more animal flesh sourced protein than any other type to maximize your health.


FIFHI; ISTP;
Started BTD 3/2002, with 2 O- secretor teenage sons

Revision History (2 edits)
MyraBee  -  Tuesday, December 19, 2006, 11:59pm
MyraBee  -  Tuesday, December 19, 2006, 11:52pm
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 47 - 90
Vicki
Tuesday, December 19, 2006, 11:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Using Custom SWAMI Food List
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 3,852
Dr. D'Adamo mentioned artery damage from animal protein in A's.  
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 48 - 90
Susana
Tuesday, December 19, 2006, 11:50pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1 Hunter 51%
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,445
Gender: Female
Location: Tenerife, Spain
Age: 51
Regarding protein consumption on the BTD for Os; ER4YT  (Spanish version) mentions we can eat protein as often as we wish but warns us of portion sizes, as our ancestors did not delight themselves with 450gm (16oz) steaks!! Meat was too scarce and precious. Dr. D does have a little go at the common meat supply (packed with antibiotics, hormones...). He advises to consume good quality meat.

In addition, he recommends Os to keep equilibrium of meat proteins, fruit, and vegetables to avoid excessive acid in stomach, which could cause ulcers and irritation.

Dr. D., also in the Spanish version of ER4YT, mentions that As, because of low stomach acid levels, meat is converted to fat. In LR4YT (original) he mentions that the low levels of hydrochloric acid in the stomach and high intestinal disaccharide levels make it difficult for As to digest and metabolize animal protein and fat.

One of the reasons why I like BTD is because Dr. D does go into some of the specifics. He does not judge others just says he recommends we have or not have so & so because he has observed or concluded from primary or secondary research that it is good or bad for us.

Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 49 - 90
4 Pages « 1 2 3 4 » All Recommend Thread
Print Print Thread

BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  A Safe Appetite Suppressant?

Thread Rating
There is currently no rating for this thread