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koolaid
Thursday, September 21, 2006, 8:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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There is a recent thread that I can't find now about the delights of cooking with ghee. Since ghee is almost entirely a saturated fat, isn't that a bit of a concern? I would think that an unsaturated fat would be preferable, although I'm sure I would love the taste.
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Don
Thursday, September 21, 2006, 8:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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koolaid
Saturday, September 23, 2006, 8:45pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I'm still looking for an answer to this question about saturated fats. BTD doesn't seem to address it.
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KimonoKat
Saturday, September 23, 2006, 9:01pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Lisa_O_Sec
I'm still looking for an answer to this question about saturated fats. BTD doesn't seem to address it.


The concern about saturated fats, to me, is centered around one size fits all diets.  The fact that Ghee has so many benefits for our health means it must be a fat that, even though "saturated," is very healthy for us.

Dr. D has recommended taking as much as two tablespoons of ghee a day on an empty stomach to heal leaky gut.  (Recommended for a Type O; found it in the archives.  It was a patient of his posting.)  Because Ghee is loaded with butyric acid, which is the main ingredient in Dr. D's Intrinsa formula.







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italybound
Sunday, September 24, 2006, 6:37pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from KimonoKat
Dr. D has recommended taking as much as two tablespoons of ghee a day on an empty stomach to heal leaky gut.


This doesn't work if you take the 2 T  a day WITH food?     I'm not sure I could take ghee by itself on an empty stomach.  



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Victoria
Sunday, September 24, 2006, 6:49pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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The ghee on an empty stomach is more of a "treatment", for such things as candida, and other gut issues.  You will definately gain benefits from just cooking with it or putting it on foods as you might use butter!  It's a very beneficial fat.  

There are fats and there are fats.  Dr. D even tells us to remove all visible fats from the meat we use.  Even so, many of us carefully following the BTD to the letter have been extremely successful in altering our blood lipid levels for the better (while eating ghee daily).  My total cholesterol has dropped from 288 to 214, with a strong shift in the ratios to a healthy range for the HDL/LDL.  

One of the keys is eating NO transfats, as in margarines, commercial foods, fast foods, commercial bakery items etc.  I'll see if I can come up with any more info on unsaturated vs. saturated, although I'm not the best expert on that subject.  I know the topic has been discussed on this Forum before and there are some folks who have some great information to share.  Hopefully they will spot the thread and chip in.  If not, it might be necessary to start another thread entitled saturated fats vs. unsaturated.



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italybound
Sunday, September 24, 2006, 7:16pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Just gotta know, when those of you who are taking ghee on an empty stomach, do you melt it and let it cool to a temp you can swallow it or do you eat it more on the solid side?



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KimonoKat
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Quoted from pkarmeier
Just gotta know, when those of you who are taking ghee on an empty stomach, do you melt it and let it cool to a temp you can swallow it or do you eat it more on the solid side?


I know I tried it first solid.  I could barely get it down.  Melted was a bit easier....however, I switched to taking Dr. D's Intrinsa vs the cheaper method of eating ghee on an empty stomach.

Totally unrelated, sorta.  My kitty had been having IBS problems off and on over the past two years.  The accupuncturist would try a homeopathic and it would work for a short time, but then not.  So, I came upon the brilliant (to me) idea of giving him a small dab of ghee every morning, and a tiny amount of ARA6 in his wet food.  Both amounts, less than 1/16th of a teaspoon.

It's working fine.  His bowel movements are way better than they have been in a long time.



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italybound
Sunday, September 24, 2006, 9:55pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ha! Funny KK, cause I had some ghee left in my bowl that still had some faint traces of dairy solids. I warmed it up and gave it to Rosco w/ some meat.  If it's so good for us, we can only hope it's so good for them too.



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Lloyd
Monday, September 25, 2006, 5:22am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from pkarmeier
Just gotta know, when those of you who are taking ghee on an empty stomach, do you melt it and let it cool to a temp you can swallow it or do you eat it more on the solid side?


I've wound up using solid from time to time, since I keep it in the fridge and don't always remember to take it out when I plan to use it. It's not too bad to put the solid in your mouth and let it melt. It melts very quickly.
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Michele
Tuesday, September 26, 2006, 3:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Personally, I find ghee absolutely disgusting.  I bought one jar and will use it, but then I'm done.  I'll use sparing amounts of butter, or none at all, but no ghee for me!
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EquiPro
Tuesday, September 26, 2006, 4:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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It might be the brand that you are using.  Please check out my other thread on Ancient Organics ghee.  


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EquiPro
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Quoted from Alan_Goldenberg


I've wound up using solid from time to time, since I keep it in the fridge and don't always remember to take it out when I plan to use it. It's not too bad to put the solid in your mouth and let it melt. It melts very quickly.


I hope that I can convince you to not put it in the fridge anymore!  I've been really reading a lot about ghee before dishing out for the Ancient Organics brand, and, universally, the ruling on refridgeration is NO!  However, it is also important to use clean utensiles when dipping into the ghee and to not contaminate it with anything if possible.  I guess it depends on how quickly you use it.




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italybound
Tuesday, September 26, 2006, 4:45pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from EquiPro
I hope that I can convince you to not put it in the fridge anymore!


It's not in the frig section at WF's. I wrote in a dif thread that I stick NOTHING but clean spoon/fork/whatever into my ghee. Others were not so careful and to each their own.   I tend to think, however, that if you should happen to put something into it that has something else on it, including saliva, I could see that altering the taste, not to mention possibly ruining it.    Think about baby food. If you don't use the whole jar and feed baby from jar, when you get it out of the frig again, it's got watery substance in it. I hear that is caused by the baby's saliva and breaks down the food as well.




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Victoria
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Quoted from Michele
Personally, I find ghee absolutely disgusting.  I bought one jar and will use it, but then I'm done.  I'll use sparing amounts of butter, or none at all, but no ghee for me!


 Maybe you're so disgusted you don't even want to talk about it.. but I'm curious how you tried to use it.  ? ?  
Dis you spread it on things as if it was butter, or have you tried it for sauteeing?

My reason for asking is that using it as a butter substitute for spreading can take some getting used to.  I love it, but I'm a dairy fiend anyway!    

If you haven't used it for cooking, I hope you'll try that approach before giving up on it completely.  If used in moderation, I think vegetables stir-fried in a tsp. of ghee are the best.

ok, I tried.  You must do what you must do.  Not pushing, here!  



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fsnaturelady
Tuesday, September 26, 2006, 6:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Ill vote for ghee!  I absolutely LOVE it!  Especially on steamed or cooked veggies!  What a spectacular flavour --I'll even drizzle a little on meat.  (To help my digestion, of course.)  




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A+Baby
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Quoted from Michele
Personally, I find ghee absolutely disgusting.  I bought one jar and will use it, but then I'm done.  I'll use sparing amounts of butter, or none at all, but no ghee for me!



Hey Michele!

To me, it's not all that great either.  I'm slowly getting used to it, but I can only take it in my polenta grits. I've tried it in my oatmeal, and it just did NOT taste right.  I'm thinking maybe it goes with the corn (polenta grits) better, taste wise, than oats (oatmeal).  I haven't tried to cook with it yet.  I'm an olive oil girl.  


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Lloyd
Tuesday, September 26, 2006, 11:27pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from EquiPro


 However, it is also important to use clean utensiles when dipping into the ghee and to not contaminate it with anything if possible.  I guess it depends on how quickly you use it.





Bingo!

BTW, you mention this stuff on refrigeration. I have not seen anything (haven't really looked.) Perhaps you might give sources/links when you make these kinds of statements?

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Lola
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ghee is sterilized once the milk solids and the extra water have been extracted through the process.

any wet utensil will disrupt its sterile qualities......
ghee doesn t need to be refrigerated for that very reason.


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EquiPro
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Quoted from Alan_Goldenberg



Bingo!

BTW, you mention this stuff on refrigeration. I have not seen anything (haven't really looked.) Perhaps you might give sources/links when you make these kinds of statements?



Sure!  I think that some of it came from one of the other ghee threads, so I didn't think to post a link.  Let me do a quick looksee over the stuff that I've read in the past couple of weeks and I'll post it here.



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EquiPro
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From http://www.ancientorganics.com

" It is clear to me that it is important to create and enjoy a beautiful and positive environment when making ghee. This subtle quality of ambiance is in line with cooking ghee on the flames of fire, it makes a difference.  Once the butter begins to boil, reduce the flame to the lowest point at which the butter will continue to boil. As it boils, moisture evaporates off and it will begin to clarify and the butter will turn from cloudy yellowish liquid to a more golden color. Whitish cloudy milk solids will rise to the top and sink to the bottom. Do not stir. After a half hour to an hour and half to several hours, depending on the amount and the size of the pot and the amount of ghee compared to the flame, your ghee will be ready. The ghee will be a clear beautiful golden color with a wonderful smell that some have compared to popcorn. The moment ghee is ready is critical and lasts only a short time. If the ghee is cooked too little, moisture will remain in the ghee and it will lack in exquisite taste and qualities. Also, because of the moisture, it will tend to spoil or sour. If ghee is cooked too much, it will burn, turn slightly darker and have a certain nutty flavor. This does not ruin the ghee at all, but it is to be noticed, so that over time you will capture the ‘perfect’ ghee to be experienced between these two ‘extremes’. After the ghee is ready, skim off the top light crust of whitish milk solids. (These and the heavier ones at the bottom of the pot are traditionally used to make sweets. Children in India love them and always plead with their Mothers to have the leftovers when ghee is made. )

Then, pour the golden, sweet-smelling liquid through layered cheesecloth to catch any last impurities, into a bottle, leaving the slightly burned milk solids (caramelized lactose) on the bottom of the pot you cooked it in (ghee contains no lactose or milk sugars). Do not close the glass jar into which you pour the hot ghee until it comes to room temperature so that no moisture from condensation may form on the inside of the jar. Moisture spoils ghee, allowing a mold to grow which will sour the ghee. This is the reason that you always use a clean and dry spoon to take your ghee out of its container. For a similar reason do not refrigerate your ghee. First of all, it is not necessary. But, most importantly, condensation will form inside the jar as you take it back and forth between a refrigerator and a warm room."


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Lloyd
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Thanks.

I'm not too worried, since I won't leave any out that has been refrigerated. A key here is that once you refrigerate, you should continue to refrigerate that batch. Furthermore, if that small an amount of condensate can create havoc - I prefer to refrigerate. Peace of mind.

Another 'each to their own' where I will be away from the majority. At least I'm used to it.    

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italybound
Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 2:41am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Over in the "I made ghee for the first time" thread and some other ghee threads I think, I mention "If you keep it on the counter, please be mindful not to put spoons, forks, etc that already have food on them, into it. It will keep longer if it stays "uncontaminated". "  (this also includes water/moisture)  IMHO, keeping it uncontaminated is a huge factor. Not everyone was as concerned about that aspect, so maybe it's just my way of thinking, I don't know. ????? I just tend to think it's a huge problem, especially if you would put a utensil back into it that had been in your mouth. Your mouth harbors so much bacteria.  




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Lloyd
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Quoted from pkarmeier
 IMHO, keeping it uncontaminated is a huge factor. Not everyone was as concerned about that aspect, so maybe it's just my way of thinking, I don't know. ?????


Sounds like solid thinking to me.
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kipperkid
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I've been reading the posts about ghee with interest, never having tried it.

Looking in typebase, ghee seems to be a neutral for most blood types, so how come everyone seems to be recommending it as if it was a beneficial

I'm confused.........  


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Henriette Bsec
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Quoted from kipperkid
I've been reading the posts about ghee with interest, never having tried it.

Looking in typebase, ghee seems to be a neutral for most blood types, so how come everyone seems to be recommending it as if it was a beneficial

I'm confused.........  


You are missing out the B nonnies and AB nonnies !
It is beneficial for them.
Why it is great:  you can fry with it at pretty high temparutures- it doesn´t burn !

I don´t use ghee on bread or oatmeal- lke the butter better- but it use it all my frying  and most of my baking.


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kipperkid
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True, but it isn't only the B nonnies and AB nonnies who are waxing lyrical about it..........


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kipperkid, hopefully this will help clear up all the hoopla about ghee.    It's from the good Dr himself.
http://www.dadamo.com/bloggers/ask/archives/00000177.htm

P.S. In further thinking about kipperkids excellent question, if ghee is so good for us, shouldn't it be changed in TB4 to beneficial for all BTs?     I know it's listed in TB4 as ghee/clarified butter - but as they seem to actually be 2 dif foods, shouldn't they be separated and ghee listed as a bennie for all?  And clarified butter left as it is?




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Michele
Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 2:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Victoria


 Maybe you're so disgusted you don't even want to talk about it.. but I'm curious how you tried to use it.  ? ?  
Dis you spread it on things as if it was butter, or have you tried it for sauteeing?

My reason for asking is that using it as a butter substitute for spreading can take some getting used to.  I love it, but I'm a dairy fiend anyway!    

If you haven't used it for cooking, I hope you'll try that approach before giving up on it completely.  If used in moderation, I think vegetables stir-fried in a tsp. of ghee are the best.

ok, I tried.  You must do what you must do.  Not pushing, here!  



You're right, I have only spread it on butter.  Ick!  I will try using it for a stir fry.  You convinced me!  
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italybound
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Michelle, also as has been mentioned, I think, it may have been the brand. If you try making your own, you might like it better. I just use organic butter and do the oven method. I let mine bake a little longer as I like mine more on the caramely color side. Oh yum...............  



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Henriette Bsec
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Quoted from kipperkid
True, but it isn't only the B nonnies and AB nonnies who are waxing lyrical about it..........




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kipperkid
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Thanks for the info, folks, I shall get myself some and see how I get on with it......


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koolaid
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To get back to the original question, in ER4YT (p349), Dr. D says the preferable cooking oil is olive oil (extra virgin), and he discusses his concern about saturated fats.

As far as making ghee is concerned, the recipe I found on this board recommends unsalted butter. My previous ghee using unsalted butter (I now have learned I didn't cook it enough) turned sour after three weeks (refrigerated), whereas my salted butter ghee lasts longer because the salt acts as a preservative. Have people had success using salted butter, or do you all recommend unsalted?

Also, I've read that unpasteurized cream/milk is superior to pasteurized, but I haven't seen any unpasteurized butter. Does anyone know whether it is available?

Thanks!
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EquiPro
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From my discussion with Peter Malakoff at Ancient Organics ghee, the ghee probably turned sour because refridgeration caused moisture to form.   It is the moisture that it the problem.  You might have found that you did not have this problem if you did not refridgerate your ghee.


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Victoria
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Quoted from Michele

You're right, I have only spread it on butter.  Ick!  I will try using it for a stir fry.  You convinced me!  


That's the spirit of adventure, Michele!    



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Victoria
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Quoted from Lisa_O_Sec
To get back to the original question, in ER4YT (p349), Dr. D says the preferable cooking oil is olive oil (extra virgin), and he discusses his concern about saturated fats.

As far as making ghee is concerned, the recipe I found on this board recommends unsalted butter. My previous ghee using unsalted butter (I now have learned I didn't cook it enough) turned sour after three weeks (refrigerated), whereas my salted butter ghee lasts longer because the salt acts as a preservative. Have people had success using salted butter, or do you all recommend unsalted?

Also, I've read that unpasteurized cream/milk is superior to pasteurized, but I haven't seen any unpasteurized butter. Does anyone know whether it is available?

Thanks!


The difficulty in cooking with Olive Oil is that high heat will damage the oil, causing it to smoke, and it becomes unhealthy.  If you saute at low temperatures, you should be ok with it.  Extra Virgin Olive Oil is at it's best used raw as a drizzle on top of foods, or made into homemade dressings.

I've never had ghee turn sour, and I've been making it off and on for 25 years.  As EquiPro and Italy have mentioned, don't refrigerate it, and if you make your own, let it cool before covering it.

As far as butter goes, Straus European Style, Organic Unsalted butter is the best quality I've found.  Straus is a great company and their cows are grass fed as much as possible.  If you use salted butter, it will still work.  You'll just have a little more junk at the bottom of the pan.



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Lloyd
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Quoted from EquiPro
From my discussion with Peter Malakoff at Ancient Organics ghee, the ghee probably turned sour because refridgeration caused moisture to form.   It is the moisture that it the problem.  You might have found that you did not have this problem if you did not refridgerate your ghee.


In a sealed container there will/should be no problem. Refrigeration is the only method I use, none has ever gone bad/sour. Also, I do not ever leave it unopened - I take out what I am using and reseal, refrigerate. Leaving an open container on the counter from the fridge is asking for trouble.
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Michele
Thursday, September 28, 2006, 12:40pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I stir-fryed with ghee last night.  You're right!  It was pretty darn good!  
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Quoted from Michele
I stir-fryed with ghee last night.  You're right!  It was pretty darn good!  


   You will prob like it more and more as you use it more.



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Victoria
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I'm glad you gave it another chance, Michelle!  I cooked with it for a long time before I came to love the taste enough to begin using it like butter on foods.  Now, I much prefer the taste of ghee over butter, and when I have to use butter, I find that it tastes somewhat "dirty".



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Quoted from Victoria
 Now, I much prefer the taste of ghee over butter, and when I have to use butter, I find that it tastes somewhat "dirty".


I had used butter for a long time. Since switching to ghee, I can tell a definite difference when using butter. That "dairy bothers me in several ways" difference. Ghee for me!!      I took to ghee right away. Just one more example of individuality, huh?  




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pkarmeier  -  Thursday, September 28, 2006, 4:14pm
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rottlady
Friday, September 29, 2006, 12:16am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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If ghee is a dairy product, why is it recommended eating for Type As?
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Quoted from rottlady
If ghee is a dairy product, why is it recommended eating for Type As?


the baking/cooking of the butter, turning it into ghee, removes the rest of the dairy solids. that's what will be at the bottom of the baking dish or pan. You strain the liquid and throw the 'crud'   away.



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Victoria
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Quoted from pkarmeier

the baking/cooking of the butter, turning it into ghee, removes the rest of the dairy solids. that's what will be at the bottom of the baking dish or pan. You strain the liquid and throw the 'crud'   away.

And, what you are left with is pure butter "oil".  



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Quoted from Victoria
And, what you are left with is pure butter "oil".  


so as you are not confused rottlady or anyone else who has never made or used ghee, it is not really an 'oil' (thus the reason Victoria has it as "oil").   It is more solid, but more like 'soft butter' (somebody help me out here)    I guess if you leave it on the counter and it's 100 degrees, it could be oil  



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Lloyd
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Quoted from Wikipedia
Properly made ghee should be semi-liquid at room temperature.


Whatever the apparent state, it is probably correct to call it an oil. A highly viscous one at room temperature!  

Quoted from an online dictionary
Oil:Noun: Any of numerous mineral, vegetable, and synthetic substances and animal and vegetable fats that are generally slippery, combustible, viscous, liquid or liquefiable at room temperatures, soluble in various organic solvents such as ether but not in water, and used in a great variety of products, especially lubricants and fuels.


Looks like ghee fits right in there.......

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pkarmeier  -  Friday, September 29, 2006, 5:54am
pkarmeier  -  Friday, September 29, 2006, 5:52am
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I guess you could say the ghee I have here is semi liquid. It is neither liquid nor solid, but in between. I just think of oil as being something you can pour freely.  



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It's the protein in the butter that some blood types shouldn't have.  Ghee does not have the protein.
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Hi koolaid,

I hope to address some of your concerns over saturates that are still outstanding.  Much of peoples' concerns have to do with a lack of understanding chemical-terminology:  the basic chemical of most 99.8%+) biology revolves around the carbon ion ... designated as 'C' it can be linked in four ways only [north, south, east, west] .... often you will see stick-drawings where -CH2-CH2-CH2-CH2- where C's are linked east-west .... The 'H' is placed north and south [my 'H2' says that there is one 'H' at the north and another at the south (cannot draw it here)].  This is a saturated bond.  Very often though the attachment is not linear(in a straight line) so the 'H' can be replaced with one -CH3 (or a whole series) of -CH2-CH2-etc.  These too are saturated (butyric and caprylic) but these act as if they were only short chain saturates ... below 10 C's the body easily handles these short-chain saturates; from 10 to 14 C's we are slow to metabolize; from 14 to 22 C's long, we have a difficult time metabolizing .... it's what white fat is made up of ... not good saturates.

now let's get into some more difficult territory: a stick drawing on unsaturates looks like -CH2-Ch2-CH=CH-CH2-CH2- etc for a single unsaturate .... typically called omega 9 or oleic acid [extra virgin olive oil has much oleic acid] .  Some have two double-bonds(=), so you get -CH2-CH=CH-CH2-CH=CH-CH2-CH2-etc.  This is the stick representation of linoleic acid of the omega-6 essential fatty acid(EFA)... sunflower, safflower. The others have 3 double bonds(=) like linolenic oil of the omega-3 family (flax; hemp and chia oil) and GLA of the  omega-6 family (evening primrose oil; borage oil; black currant seed oil). Longer-chain EFA's have even more unsaturated spots ... either 4 (AA of the omega-6 family) or 5 (EPA of the omega-3 family) and 6 (DHA of the omega-3 family).

This diagram does not show the 'bent' nature of these bonds ... some would be shaped like a cooked hotdog and others [like DHA] will look almost circular like the capital 'omega' symbol in the Greek alphabet.  IMHO children easily make cholesterol from here.  If the molecule desatuates/elongates just once more it becomes even more twisted and unstable and readily forms two stable rings ............ 3 unsaturated bonds in one ring=3 unsaturated bonds in a second ring.  This is the basic structure of squalene ... which becomes cholesterol .... some of which becomes all hormones.

The 'bent 'nature is important because it is these that carry oxygen and free-electrons and packets of energy.  The 'bent' structure is in 'cis' bonds only.  This means that when there is a double-bond(=) the H bonding will be on the same (usually designated North-side) on each -CH=CH-.  If a 'trans' bond occurs the H will be kitty-corner one on North and one on South.  This has the effect of straightening the molecule and no transport of oxygen, electrons or energy is possible ... it is similar to removing the tracks from one side of a railroad line.

hope this helps .................

John


“The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane.” – Marcus Aurelius

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koolaid
Friday, September 29, 2006, 6:38pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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FINALLY! An answer! Thanks a million, John.

I wish I knew where to locate this level of information, but short of that, I have the BTD Forum!

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Quoted from Lisa_O_Sec
FINALLY! An answer! Thanks a million, John.

I wish I knew where to locate this level of information, but short of that, I have the BTD Forum!



There is a ton of information on the internet that can be dug up through searches, it does take some time and effort.

One quick source that is usually reliable and has some links as well is Wikipedia

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Hi koolaid,

if you like to read books: 'Fats that Kill; Fats that Heal' by Udo Erasmus, alive Publishers, @1987 is the source of much of this basic info.  Also highly praised is a book by Dr. Mary Enig ... can't recall its name, because I never have read it.

John


“The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane.” – Marcus Aurelius

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koolaid
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Ok, I'm a ghee convert. I bought a pound of unsalted Straus butter, used Rebecca Woods' recipe linked on this site, roasting a half pound in the oven at 300 degrees for an hour. Golden, yes. The scent, miraculous, better than most expensive colognes I've tried.  
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Quoted from Lisa_O_Sec
Ok, I'm a ghee convert. I bought a pound of unsalted Straus butter, used Rebecca Woods' recipe linked on this site, roasting a half pound in the oven at 300 degrees for an hour. Golden, yes. The scent, miraculous, better than most expensive colognes I've tried.  




It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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Quoted from Lisa_O_Sec
The scent, miraculous, better than most expensive colognes I've tried.  


 Cute.......but I gotta say......I just love the smell of ghee as well.   And so easy to make in the oven, right koolaid.   I just laugh every time I think about how 'afraid' I was to make it.  




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Quoted from Lisa_O_Sec
Ok, I'm a ghee convert. I bought a pound of unsalted Straus butter, used Rebecca Woods' recipe linked on this site, roasting a half pound in the oven at 300 degrees for an hour. Golden, yes. The scent, miraculous, better than most expensive colognes I've tried.  


The aromatherapy of Ghee!  Very much a "comfort food scent".  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
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~Mary Jean Irion
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LuHu
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Alright, already. I really HAVE to do this, now. We got our first cool nites here in the good ol' piedmont area of NC this past week and more are forecast. Also, since Rachel brought our attention to the Ancient Organics brand (which uses STRAUS milk for its ghee) I am going to do it. May be as close as I get to buying their ghee for a while. I can buy Straus Eureopean style cultured unsalted butter for $5.89/pound and I need a reason to swoon! I'm sure that  on one of these really clear, really crisp, autumn nights, the smell of the Ghee simmering in MY oven will be equal to the sensory experience you guys/gals describe. It really does sound like something you gotta do at least once! Hope I'll have Italy's outcome and end up saying, "Why didn't I do this sooner?!?"  


"Some people look out and see a land of giants while others look out and see a land flowing with milk and honey."
(As BTDers, please substitute your most desirable, delightful bennie for the figurative 'milk and honey'!)
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Quoted from LuHu
Hope I'll have Italy's outcome and end up saying, "Why didn't I do this sooner?!?"  


Oh you will my dear, you will.  



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Quoted from Lisa_O_Sec
The scent, miraculous


I too agree 100%. Just made my first batch ever, thanks to the wonderful descriptions and hearty recommendations in the ghee threads. The wonderful scent was the best part. The smell of baking is the one that makes me feel it's truly home (I do not bake...     I used to, in my youth), but this one feels super-home, so sweet, enveloping, heart warming, intoxicating, relaxing.




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Quoted from yael_p

The wonderful scent was the best part. The smell of baking is the one that makes me feel it's truly home (I do not bake...     I used to, in my youth), but this one feels super-home, so sweet, enveloping, heart warming, intoxicating, relaxing.


And we have another one, Ladies and Gentlemen!  

(Welcome to the Ghee Fan Club, Yael.   )



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yaeli
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Enchante!  

Thanks dear Victoria, I'm on cloud nine! I keep it on my counter in a small ceramic jar covered by a small ceramic saucer as a lid, and go there every now and then, raise the lid and sniff!!  


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I hope you will eventually be willing to part with some of the treasured bowl of pure fragrant gold, so that you can dip in a spoon and cook with it!  



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Clean spoon every time! Pure gold, that's it... love it. For sure, I won't delay. I already had my 1st spoon as is - and thought I was never going to be hungry again!


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Quoted from yael_p
I keep it on my counter in a small ceramic jar covered by a small ceramic saucer as a lid, and go there every now and then, raise the lid and sniff!!  


, I keep mine on the counter too, but not covered. so when i walk by it, i can smell it. it does smell sooooooooooooo good. it's like a comfort food/smell isn't it. the DH may have to go, as he said the other day that whatever I had in the oven (ghee), stunk. WELL!!!!!!  



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I took the plunge and made my first batch of ghee last night and used it to sautee this mornings breakfast.  It was everything I've been reading it was!  Thanks for the oven recipe (don't remember exactly who it was that posted it  )!  So easy and delicious and good for you...can't get better than ghee!
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It's Italy! Thanks Pat, I followed your way!


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Quoted from yael_p
It's Italy! Thanks Pat, I followed your way!


yael p and Mare eo, I'm glad you both found the oven method so easy. since I love me some ghee, 'tis really good I have a really easy way to make it. then I don't mind to make it and I am sure to always have some on hand.       never thought I could 'eat' it by itself, but melted a T. the other morning and had some and it wasn't bad.



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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  Ghee for cooking & saturated fats

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