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Ghee for cooking & saturated fats  This thread currently has 2,799 views. Print Print Thread
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Henriette Bsec
Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 11:49am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from kipperkid
I've been reading the posts about ghee with interest, never having tried it.

Looking in typebase, ghee seems to be a neutral for most blood types, so how come everyone seems to be recommending it as if it was a beneficial

I'm confused.........  


You are missing out the B nonnies and AB nonnies !
It is beneficial for them.
Why it is great:  you can fry with it at pretty high temparutures- it doesn´t burn !

I don´t use ghee on bread or oatmeal- lke the butter better- but it use it all my frying  and most of my baking.


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kipperkid
Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 12:18pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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True, but it isn't only the B nonnies and AB nonnies who are waxing lyrical about it..........


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italybound
Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 1:15pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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kipperkid, hopefully this will help clear up all the hoopla about ghee.    It's from the good Dr himself.
http://www.dadamo.com/bloggers/ask/archives/00000177.htm

P.S. In further thinking about kipperkids excellent question, if ghee is so good for us, shouldn't it be changed in TB4 to beneficial for all BTs?     I know it's listed in TB4 as ghee/clarified butter - but as they seem to actually be 2 dif foods, shouldn't they be separated and ghee listed as a bennie for all?  And clarified butter left as it is?




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pkarmeier  -  Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 1:37pm
pkarmeier  -  Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 1:34pm
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Michele
Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 2:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Victoria


 Maybe you're so disgusted you don't even want to talk about it.. but I'm curious how you tried to use it.  ? ?  
Dis you spread it on things as if it was butter, or have you tried it for sauteeing?

My reason for asking is that using it as a butter substitute for spreading can take some getting used to.  I love it, but I'm a dairy fiend anyway!    

If you haven't used it for cooking, I hope you'll try that approach before giving up on it completely.  If used in moderation, I think vegetables stir-fried in a tsp. of ghee are the best.

ok, I tried.  You must do what you must do.  Not pushing, here!  



You're right, I have only spread it on butter.  Ick!  I will try using it for a stir fry.  You convinced me!  
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italybound
Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 2:15pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Michelle, also as has been mentioned, I think, it may have been the brand. If you try making your own, you might like it better. I just use organic butter and do the oven method. I let mine bake a little longer as I like mine more on the caramely color side. Oh yum...............  



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Henriette Bsec
Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 2:26pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from kipperkid
True, but it isn't only the B nonnies and AB nonnies who are waxing lyrical about it..........




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kipperkid
Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 3:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thanks for the info, folks, I shall get myself some and see how I get on with it......


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koolaid
Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 4:04pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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To get back to the original question, in ER4YT (p349), Dr. D says the preferable cooking oil is olive oil (extra virgin), and he discusses his concern about saturated fats.

As far as making ghee is concerned, the recipe I found on this board recommends unsalted butter. My previous ghee using unsalted butter (I now have learned I didn't cook it enough) turned sour after three weeks (refrigerated), whereas my salted butter ghee lasts longer because the salt acts as a preservative. Have people had success using salted butter, or do you all recommend unsalted?

Also, I've read that unpasteurized cream/milk is superior to pasteurized, but I haven't seen any unpasteurized butter. Does anyone know whether it is available?

Thanks!
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EquiPro
Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 4:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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From my discussion with Peter Malakoff at Ancient Organics ghee, the ghee probably turned sour because refridgeration caused moisture to form.   It is the moisture that it the problem.  You might have found that you did not have this problem if you did not refridgerate your ghee.


FRESH START TODAY!!!
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Victoria
Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 6:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Michele

You're right, I have only spread it on butter.  Ick!  I will try using it for a stir fry.  You convinced me!  


That's the spirit of adventure, Michele!    



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Victoria
Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 7:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Lisa_O_Sec
To get back to the original question, in ER4YT (p349), Dr. D says the preferable cooking oil is olive oil (extra virgin), and he discusses his concern about saturated fats.

As far as making ghee is concerned, the recipe I found on this board recommends unsalted butter. My previous ghee using unsalted butter (I now have learned I didn't cook it enough) turned sour after three weeks (refrigerated), whereas my salted butter ghee lasts longer because the salt acts as a preservative. Have people had success using salted butter, or do you all recommend unsalted?

Also, I've read that unpasteurized cream/milk is superior to pasteurized, but I haven't seen any unpasteurized butter. Does anyone know whether it is available?

Thanks!


The difficulty in cooking with Olive Oil is that high heat will damage the oil, causing it to smoke, and it becomes unhealthy.  If you saute at low temperatures, you should be ok with it.  Extra Virgin Olive Oil is at it's best used raw as a drizzle on top of foods, or made into homemade dressings.

I've never had ghee turn sour, and I've been making it off and on for 25 years.  As EquiPro and Italy have mentioned, don't refrigerate it, and if you make your own, let it cool before covering it.

As far as butter goes, Straus European Style, Organic Unsalted butter is the best quality I've found.  Straus is a great company and their cows are grass fed as much as possible.  If you use salted butter, it will still work.  You'll just have a little more junk at the bottom of the pan.



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Lloyd
Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 10:18pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from EquiPro
From my discussion with Peter Malakoff at Ancient Organics ghee, the ghee probably turned sour because refridgeration caused moisture to form.   It is the moisture that it the problem.  You might have found that you did not have this problem if you did not refridgerate your ghee.


In a sealed container there will/should be no problem. Refrigeration is the only method I use, none has ever gone bad/sour. Also, I do not ever leave it unopened - I take out what I am using and reseal, refrigerate. Leaving an open container on the counter from the fridge is asking for trouble.
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Michele
Thursday, September 28, 2006, 12:40pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I stir-fryed with ghee last night.  You're right!  It was pretty darn good!  
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italybound
Thursday, September 28, 2006, 1:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from Michele
I stir-fryed with ghee last night.  You're right!  It was pretty darn good!  


   You will prob like it more and more as you use it more.



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Victoria
Thursday, September 28, 2006, 4:09pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I'm glad you gave it another chance, Michelle!  I cooked with it for a long time before I came to love the taste enough to begin using it like butter on foods.  Now, I much prefer the taste of ghee over butter, and when I have to use butter, I find that it tastes somewhat "dirty".



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italybound
Thursday, September 28, 2006, 4:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from Victoria
 Now, I much prefer the taste of ghee over butter, and when I have to use butter, I find that it tastes somewhat "dirty".


I had used butter for a long time. Since switching to ghee, I can tell a definite difference when using butter. That "dairy bothers me in several ways" difference. Ghee for me!!      I took to ghee right away. Just one more example of individuality, huh?  




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rottlady
Friday, September 29, 2006, 12:16am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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If ghee is a dairy product, why is it recommended eating for Type As?
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italybound
Friday, September 29, 2006, 12:20am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from rottlady
If ghee is a dairy product, why is it recommended eating for Type As?


the baking/cooking of the butter, turning it into ghee, removes the rest of the dairy solids. that's what will be at the bottom of the baking dish or pan. You strain the liquid and throw the 'crud'   away.



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Victoria
Friday, September 29, 2006, 1:39am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from pkarmeier

the baking/cooking of the butter, turning it into ghee, removes the rest of the dairy solids. that's what will be at the bottom of the baking dish or pan. You strain the liquid and throw the 'crud'   away.

And, what you are left with is pure butter "oil".  



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italybound
Friday, September 29, 2006, 2:13am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from Victoria
And, what you are left with is pure butter "oil".  


so as you are not confused rottlady or anyone else who has never made or used ghee, it is not really an 'oil' (thus the reason Victoria has it as "oil").   It is more solid, but more like 'soft butter' (somebody help me out here)    I guess if you leave it on the counter and it's 100 degrees, it could be oil  



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Lloyd
Friday, September 29, 2006, 5:46am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Wikipedia
Properly made ghee should be semi-liquid at room temperature.


Whatever the apparent state, it is probably correct to call it an oil. A highly viscous one at room temperature!  

Quoted from an online dictionary
Oil:Noun: Any of numerous mineral, vegetable, and synthetic substances and animal and vegetable fats that are generally slippery, combustible, viscous, liquid or liquefiable at room temperatures, soluble in various organic solvents such as ether but not in water, and used in a great variety of products, especially lubricants and fuels.


Looks like ghee fits right in there.......

Revision History (3 edits)
pkarmeier  -  Friday, September 29, 2006, 5:54am
pkarmeier  -  Friday, September 29, 2006, 5:52am
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italybound
Friday, September 29, 2006, 2:24pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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I guess you could say the ghee I have here is semi liquid. It is neither liquid nor solid, but in between. I just think of oil as being something you can pour freely.  



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NewHampshireGirl
Friday, September 29, 2006, 2:27pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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It's the protein in the butter that some blood types shouldn't have.  Ghee does not have the protein.
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resting
Friday, September 29, 2006, 6:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sam Dan
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Hi koolaid,

I hope to address some of your concerns over saturates that are still outstanding.  Much of peoples' concerns have to do with a lack of understanding chemical-terminology:  the basic chemical of most 99.8%+) biology revolves around the carbon ion ... designated as 'C' it can be linked in four ways only [north, south, east, west] .... often you will see stick-drawings where -CH2-CH2-CH2-CH2- where C's are linked east-west .... The 'H' is placed north and south [my 'H2' says that there is one 'H' at the north and another at the south (cannot draw it here)].  This is a saturated bond.  Very often though the attachment is not linear(in a straight line) so the 'H' can be replaced with one -CH3 (or a whole series) of -CH2-CH2-etc.  These too are saturated (butyric and caprylic) but these act as if they were only short chain saturates ... below 10 C's the body easily handles these short-chain saturates; from 10 to 14 C's we are slow to metabolize; from 14 to 22 C's long, we have a difficult time metabolizing .... it's what white fat is made up of ... not good saturates.

now let's get into some more difficult territory: a stick drawing on unsaturates looks like -CH2-Ch2-CH=CH-CH2-CH2- etc for a single unsaturate .... typically called omega 9 or oleic acid [extra virgin olive oil has much oleic acid] .  Some have two double-bonds(=), so you get -CH2-CH=CH-CH2-CH=CH-CH2-CH2-etc.  This is the stick representation of linoleic acid of the omega-6 essential fatty acid(EFA)... sunflower, safflower. The others have 3 double bonds(=) like linolenic oil of the omega-3 family (flax; hemp and chia oil) and GLA of the  omega-6 family (evening primrose oil; borage oil; black currant seed oil). Longer-chain EFA's have even more unsaturated spots ... either 4 (AA of the omega-6 family) or 5 (EPA of the omega-3 family) and 6 (DHA of the omega-3 family).

This diagram does not show the 'bent' nature of these bonds ... some would be shaped like a cooked hotdog and others [like DHA] will look almost circular like the capital 'omega' symbol in the Greek alphabet.  IMHO children easily make cholesterol from here.  If the molecule desatuates/elongates just once more it becomes even more twisted and unstable and readily forms two stable rings ............ 3 unsaturated bonds in one ring=3 unsaturated bonds in a second ring.  This is the basic structure of squalene ... which becomes cholesterol .... some of which becomes all hormones.

The 'bent 'nature is important because it is these that carry oxygen and free-electrons and packets of energy.  The 'bent' structure is in 'cis' bonds only.  This means that when there is a double-bond(=) the H bonding will be on the same (usually designated North-side) on each -CH=CH-.  If a 'trans' bond occurs the H will be kitty-corner one on North and one on South.  This has the effect of straightening the molecule and no transport of oxygen, electrons or energy is possible ... it is similar to removing the tracks from one side of a railroad line.

hope this helps .................

John


“The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane.” – Marcus Aurelius

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koolaid
Friday, September 29, 2006, 6:38pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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FINALLY! An answer! Thanks a million, John.

I wish I knew where to locate this level of information, but short of that, I have the BTD Forum!

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