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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  Beneficial dislikes?
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Beneficial dislikes?  This thread currently has 3,857 views. Print Print Thread
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Lisalea
Saturday, March 17, 2007, 3:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Ee Dan
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Quoted from Victoria
Another way to eat spinach is wilted.  I find it much nicer than well-cooked.  It is such a tender green, it doesn't really need cooking.  If you cook meat in a pan, after it is done, remove the meat, pour off excess fats, and put in the clean spinach while the pan is still hot.  Stir around in the hot drippings until the leaves are wilted, and well saturated in the drippings and seasonings that were left in the pan.


I usually eat spinach with barley, butter and seasalt .. it's simply delicious !!!  


The older I get, the more wide-eyed I become.  
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Drea
Saturday, March 17, 2007, 4:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from richgirlred

I'm not having a lot of luck cultivating a taste for soy cheese. I've tried several different brands in several different dishes and it still tastes like "green plastic." I'm not giving up though! If it's a beneficial, I'm all about learning to love it.


Welcome richgirlred!

I've yet to discover a soy cheese that didn't have an avoid or two (or three!) in it, so now I stay away from it entirely. The texture isn't so great to me that I want to waste eating it with avoids.

I tend to eat goat or sheep cheese instead. Not a lot, though, cause they can pack on the pounds and I'm trying to unpack the pounds at the moment.


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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Victoria
Saturday, March 17, 2007, 4:11pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from LISALEA


I usually eat spinach with barley, butter and seasalt .. it's simply delicious !!!  


Dear LisaLea,

Barley + type B = Avoid




Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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richgirlred
Saturday, March 17, 2007, 4:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Thanks Drea!

I think it's really "cheesy" (pun fully intended) when "they" (those evil food people) contaminate perfectly good beneficials with nasty avoids.

I love feta cheese but can only eat it "on" or "in" things--I can't take it straight. Sometimes I just need a piece of cheese! (for protein, to compliment my red wine, etc.) I usually eat low-fat mozzarella in those instances.

I hear you with the "unpacking the pounds" plan! I'm feeling less like a "Dixie Chick" and more like a "Dixie Chunk!"
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Victoria
Saturday, March 17, 2007, 4:18pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from richgirlred

I'll eat rice cakes--even though there are strong similarities to munching on styrofoam. (Spread with a little peanut butter, it's flavored styrofoam but way better.)


Try those rice cakes lightly toasted, and they're quite delicious.  It brings out the flavor and the crisp texture doesn't resemble styrofoam.  It's more like popcorn then.

I'm an ex-southerner, if you can ever be an ex, where the South is concerned.  I was raised on everything avoid, and those food tastes are still buried somewhere!  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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richgirlred
Saturday, March 17, 2007, 4:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Toasted? I never thought of that! They definitely need a little sumpin' sumpin' to spark them up a bit. My two dogs, who will eat virtually anything that hits the floor, walk away in disdain from rice cakes!

Honey, once a southerner, always a southerner! If you were born here, you never lose your birthright! I'll bet I could bake you a biscuit that would make you slap your mama! (If I were still baking biscuits, which I'm not, I promise! Really, no biscuits baked around here, no way . . .)
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Victoria
Saturday, March 17, 2007, 4:34pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Oh, you tempt me, RGR!    Even though I wouldn't touch them with a ten-foot pole, it makes me salivate just to hear the mention of southern biscuits, especially if you have some freshly churned sweet butter like my Grandmom used to make, and then smother the whole thing with some hot gravy.  

Pure avoid heaven!  (Maybe we could have a few sausage patties on the side!)



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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Victoria
Saturday, March 17, 2007, 4:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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On the subject of disliking beneficials, I seem to quickly develop a taste for anything and everything that is really healthy for my body.  The only thing I have any difficulty with is fish.  I do love salmon, but it's not beneficial for me.  I have actually come to love sardines, DREA!!    It took me a while, but the key seems to be to eat them with other foods that you already like.  

Most of the fish that are beneficial for me, I've never heard of.  Common ones like Cod, I only like breaded and deep fried, which wouldn't work for me, since the whole frying process seems very unhealthy to my way of thinking.  Maybe I'll get beyond it, and experiement a little, but I don't eat flour of any kind, so that limits my options with cod.

Mackerel is fantastic for my blood type, but it is really pretty distasteful for my tastebuds.  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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Henriette Bsec
Sunday, March 18, 2007, 8:55am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

swamied nomad chameleon receptor worldview
Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from Victoria

Mackerel is fantastic for my blood type, but it is really pretty distasteful for my tastebuds. †


Oh Iīm with you for sure !
Mackerel is very common here in tins with tomatosauce - seved on ryebread with mayo- and I alwys felt like when my friends in school had some.....
My kid feels the same about theese fishy sandwiches...
Problem with fish is that it has to be sooo fresh that most of us do not get it anymore unless we fish ourselves.

Yesterday I wanted to cook some cod- took some up from freezer- from a high class company- and when they defrosted they smelled so horrible fishy!
I understand why a fatty fish like mackerel/herring or slamon can smell strong!-
but cod should not since it is so lean!!!
I got so angry that I wrote to their consumer center- it simply must be bad fish !
Cod has alwys been a "safe" fish for me- pure white flesh- not fishy at all.... but after this I will only buy fish in fish shops.



ENFP -naturalist, visual/spatial and musical/verbal/chatty Dane- Mother to DD Emma age 19,
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Diamonds, superfoods, Neutral,*black dots, avoids
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Drea
Sunday, March 18, 2007, 2:22pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from richgirlred
I love feta cheese but can only eat it "on" or "in" things--I can't take it straight. Sometimes I just need a piece of cheese! (for protein, to compliment my red wine, etc.) I usually eat low-fat mozzarella in those instances.

Have you ever tried pecurino (sheeps cheese)? Really good, but a little goes a long way.

Quoted from richgirlred
I'm feeling less like a "Dixie Chick" and more like a "Dixie Chunk!"


ROTFLMAO


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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Lyrica
Monday, March 19, 2007, 12:38am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Pineapple!  I find it hideously disgusting.
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Ribbit
Monday, March 19, 2007, 3:10am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Okay.  After reading 5 pages of okra and turnip green complaints, I, as a born-and-raised Southerner, see the need to educate y'all.

There are several ways to make okra, the best of course being fried in a trusty ole iron skillet.  My mama always cut it up fresh and coated it in corn meal and fried it in safflower oil.  We (now all on the BTD) have experimented with spelt flour, rice flour and millet flour, and millet flour is our favorite, as it makes the okra crunchy.  If you cut it up fresh, it's not slimy at all.  If you have to buy it frozen, just thaw it out then you can rinse the slime off or just go ahead and coat it really well in whatever flour you're using.  Fry it in olive oil till it's browned or nearly black.  It will be a little gummy in the middle if you use frozen, but still very tasty.  My husband won't eat it unless it's burned to a crisp.  I like to sprinkle a little freshly ground coriander on it.  Salt it if you feel you must.

Okra is fine in a gumbo too, if you can eat any of the ingredients in gumbo, or add it to soup.  If you steam/boil it, leave the top on and use it as a handle--stab it with your fork and eat the good end.  Actually, you can eat the stem too if you've cooked it long enough to be tender.  Once you get used to it it's actually pretty good.  But if you're trying it for the first time, go for fried.  Here's something I have yet to try but have read it's good:  if you grow okra yourself (I highly recommend it if you live in zone 6 or South of), you will end up with a few pods that escaped your notice and got too big and tough to eat.  In that case, you can leave them on the stalk to dry, then shell out the seeds like peas.  You can cook them like dry beans and they're good protein.

Now, the traditional Southern way to cook greens is with a ham bone or bacon.  Obviously that's out for all of us unless we use turkey bacon (which usually contains at least one minor avoid).  If you can have apple cider vinegar, sprinkle a little on your cooked greens.  Delicious!  If vinegar is out, use a little lemon juice.  Also, some types of greens are more bitter than others.  If you find them really aweful by themselves, throw a few into soup or dry beans and they're less obvious.

Around here, when somebody complains that I've made something yucky again (usually turnips is the only thing to get that comment), I say, "Hey.  In this house we eat to feel good, not because it tastes good."


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Drea
Monday, March 19, 2007, 4:36am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thank you Ribbit, for educating us ! I'm loving the greens and okra. I just had to get up the nerve to try okra for the first time. Now I eat it almost every week. I haven't been able to find it fresh in the stores (probably not the right season), but can find it canned and frozen. I actually kind of like the slightly gummy texture; especially the seeds. I'm glad to hear that there are substitutions for breading and frying. I'v been sautee-ing the okra in a bit of ghee and salt it at the end of the cooking. Yummmm.


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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Drea
Monday, March 19, 2007, 4:36am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Lyrica
Pineapple!  I find it hideously disgusting.


More for me!  


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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Lyrica
Monday, March 19, 2007, 6:30am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from outdoordrea


More for me! †


Awesome!  

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yaeli
Monday, March 19, 2007, 2:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Quoted from Victoria
Mackerel is fantastic for my blood type, but it is really pretty distasteful for my tastebuds. †


Victoria, you may like to try and cook fresh mackerel in lots of lemon juice (and water), and maybe bay leaves & allspice, i.e. 'marinated'.

To prepare cod (I can only buy it frozen), I cook onions and garlic in olive oil, then add the fillets, and: turmeric, sweet paprika, a little bit of hot paprika, bay leaves and: ground cardamon, ground ginger, ground coriander seeds, a dash of cinnamon and maybe tiny dash of cloves, and: little water. 20-25 min on low-medium heat. It's too delicious. How can it be that I myself cook something so tasty, I wonder.



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Victoria
Monday, March 19, 2007, 6:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ribbit,
Thanks for that wonderful southern fried Okra recipe!  

Yael,
When you cook your fish in water, do you cover it while cooking?  I can't visualize how you do it?  Is it in a skillet with only a little water, or in a pot with a lot of water?  Thanks for trying to help me like fishes!  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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shape5
Monday, March 19, 2007, 8:31pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Yael, where around these parts do you get frozen cod?
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Lisalea
Monday, March 19, 2007, 8:51pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Ee Dan
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Quoted from Victoria


Dear LisaLea,

Barley + type B = Avoid



I just saw this post today !!

and we've since discussed the barley confusion, hence at least for now till further notice by Dr. D it's a neutral and I just ate some today for lunch with brussels sprouts, feta cheese, olive oil, onions and cayenne pepper !!
Yummmmiiii  


The older I get, the more wide-eyed I become.  
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yaeli
Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 1:16am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from shape5
Yael, where around these parts do you get frozen cod?


a) In Machane Yehuda at the fish mongers': David Dagim opposite Ha'Egoz St. - my regular at the market (expensive though, NIS 65 per kilo), and Ohana Dagim both keep it.
b) although you can find it wrapped in vacuum in any supermarket (mostly by Delidag), I prefer to buy at Itliz Shoshani in Emek Refa'im, because they are trustworthy and I can rely on the way they handle the merchandise, that is, once †the fish is thawed you can trust you won't have to throw it immediately into the dustbin. I buy my fish at Shoshani's regularly, and also at David Dagim, where you can find a variety of wonderful fresh fish from the sea. Wonerful time to visit the market is of course Fridays at 6:30 AM.



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yaeli
Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 2:34am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Victoria
Yael,
When you cook your fish in water, do you cover it while cooking? †I can't visualize how you do it? †Is it in a skillet with only a little water, or in a pot with a lot of water? †Thanks for trying to help me like fishes! †


Yes, I use a pot and cover it while cooking, so as to keep the heat and not let the water evaporate. For cod, the water doesn't have to cover the fish - the less the amount of water the tastier the result. The recipe for the mackarel is a hearsay, †my best friend told my 3 days ago how she prepared it. I dared to write about it because she told me that she enjoyed it so much. When I do it myself, I'll cover the mackarel well with the lemon juice and water, and will report.


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Victoria
Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 3:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thanks, Yael,
I saved your fish recipe in my recipe files.  The spices you use with the cod sound very good.  Have you ever tried cooking it for a shorter period of time?



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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yaeli
Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 5:49am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Quoted from Victoria
Thanks, Yael,
I saved your fish recipe in my recipe files. †The spices you use with the cod sound very good. †Have you ever tried cooking it for a shorter period of time?


Hi Victoria,
The thing is, I just wouldn't dare cooking a fish for less than 20 minutes, for fear it's not completely cooked, for fear of worms, germs etc. I never touch raw fish either... I'd rather overcook it a bit...
Love
Yael †


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shape5
Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 9:50am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Yael, thank you for the info. I was at the shuk on Thursday (but got salmon), but Emek Rephaim is right around the corner. Sort of.
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yaeli
Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 1:08pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from shape5
Emek Rephaim is right around the corner. Sort of.


That's very good - I come all the way from Malha!... He's really very good. Clean, professional, respectable, lots of customers. Also the price of fresh wild salmon fillet is much lower than at the shuk, and sometimes there are 'mivtza'im'. Enjoy!! †


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