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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  Whole Milk/Dairy and Type B
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Whole Milk/Dairy and Type B  This thread currently has 5,856 views. Print Print Thread
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Kristin
Tuesday, December 13, 2005, 4:00am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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When I was in Santa Fe recently, I went to a Farmer's Market that had fresh goat's cheese... the freshest I ever tasted... flavored with garlic and loads of fresh dill. It was soooo good!

But... the goat's milk fudge... unbelievable!!!! And just made with goat's milk, Baker's chocolate, sugar and vanilla!!



The true meaning of life is to plant trees under whose shade you do not expect to sit.

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Victoria
Tuesday, December 13, 2005, 4:18am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Spoken like a true B, Kristen!!




Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
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hitch
Tuesday, December 13, 2005, 5:42am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I have lost my copy of ER4YT and can't remember why cow's milk is good for B's besides the fact that the sugar is the same as B's? I want to believe dairy can be good, but I don't see how B's thousands of years ago would be able to get dairy from wild cows when the B blood type was just beginning. I've taken a lot in interest in The Paleo Diet, which is basically the O type diet, no grains, legumes, or dairy. But I realize B's are a little bit different when it comes to dairy, can anyone give me any links or info for why dairy is good for B's, and is it only raw milk that is good?
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san j
Tuesday, December 13, 2005, 3:11pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Hitch:

Why not "hitch" this post to an adjacent thread: "B and Whole Milk/Dairy"? This is a common concern of B's and AB's.

Don't have time right now to address your question, but will get back to you.  As for "wild cows", think about goats and sheep and camels.

Catch you later!


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Schluggell
Tuesday, December 13, 2005, 6:52pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Us B's have an interesting history-I think dairy as good for us as more than just cows. But that is what gets the research in modern times.

I remember reading somewhere that the last wild cow was killed in Poland around 1635.
Look at how the mongols survived with mares milk-and they are a high percentage of B.


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Victoria
Tuesday, December 13, 2005, 10:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sun Beh Nim
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I think cow's milk is probably the least ideal of all the milks, unfortunately it's the one that is the most readily available in our culture.
Goat and sheep milk is much more digestable, and probably milked by ancient B's!



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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san j
Tuesday, December 13, 2005, 10:54pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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OOO Kristen: Make us all jealous!! Now it's MY turn:

Here in San Francisco there's a Frenchman who opened a few patisseries... Try to IMAGINE, with your B imaginations, his CHEVRE/Nectarine tarte!!!


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Ellie
Tuesday, December 13, 2005, 11:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kristin, does the fudge not taste "goaty"???

Exj_j, the french certainly know how to make good cakes/tarts. It's making my mouth water.I bet the nectarine goes really well with "chevre". Is the nectarine on top of the "chevre" - it can't  be actual cheese, or can it in the tarte? (I live in the land of Welsh cakes and Bara Brith (fruit loaf) so please excuse ignorance)


8 feb 2008:Weight Loss on GTD so far (without trying): 4 kilos (about 8 lbs - half a stone)
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Victoria
Wednesday, December 14, 2005, 1:20am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ellie,
Chevrie is a very soft, spreadable cheese, so it would make a great base for a tart filling.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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Kristin
Wednesday, December 14, 2005, 1:23am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Hi Ellie  

No... the fudge did not taste"goaty" at all. Nor did the cheese have that strong goat tang.

Both were really something... I think the freshness made the difference.


The true meaning of life is to plant trees under whose shade you do not expect to sit.

- Nelson Henderson
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san j
Wednesday, December 14, 2005, 3:41pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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The french chevre/nectarine tarte:  Light crust, then the chevre (think cheesecake), then the magnificently concentric (or) spiraling paper thin nectarine slices and their glaze.

Une vraie merveille.


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exj_j  -  Wednesday, December 14, 2005, 11:15pm
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Ellie
Wednesday, December 14, 2005, 8:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Hi Kristin

I remember Victoria was it? talking about the fresher the goats milk etc then the milder the taste. ..How fab to find something so tasty! Have you got yourself a year's supply?!

Exj-j  

that does sound like what I was imagining,  I'm sure I have had similar things when "en France". Mind you, had some really nice cakes for breakfast on my first visit to Germany - just ate what I was given!


For me eating and finding these cheeses is a real novelty. I was "diagnosed" with lactose intolerance about 10 years ago, so for years drank mainly soya milk. But I did find i seemed ok with some cheeses - generally the softer ones - and couldn't understand why, but didn't eat a lot.  I did see a dietician for a while and I got really cross because she was trying to force me back onto milk again, which I couldn't take at that time. Touch wood, I may be able to have more than I ever thought I could, and adds a bit more variety to the menu. Thanks for your enthusiasm exj_j, it has helped me to think more about the role of dairy in my life  (sound like I'm at the Oscars now! )


8 feb 2008:Weight Loss on GTD so far (without trying): 4 kilos (about 8 lbs - half a stone)
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Victoria
Thursday, December 15, 2005, 1:24am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Generally, the softer and younger cheeses are better for B's because the microbes in the older, aged, harder cheeses can cause difficulties for us.  Hence, what a joy to find great young cheeses!



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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san j
Tuesday, January 3, 2006, 2:03am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Since I started doing the Full-Fat Dairy 4 months ago, I've allowed it to take over more of the meat role than at the beginning.  I'm definitely eating less meat and fish than before, and it feels great, actually.  I think it's truer to the Nomad/Steppe-shepherd Way anyway. Meat is still a major player, but, I don't know, it seems I'm buying a whole lot less of it. And I include fish under "meat". I'm not even CLOSE to vegetarian.  But I'm getting awfully good at concocting yummy things with cream and cheese ... not a huge yogurt fan, but it's in there.

Just thought I'd revive this important thread...


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exj_j  -  Tuesday, January 3, 2006, 2:04am
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Ellie
Tuesday, January 3, 2006, 10:31pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Glad you're still enjoying the cheeses exj-j- are you still dropping weight?

I've run out of my special cheeses so have to see whether I can pick up anything here in the town, but it won't be the same (sad face).....

I did enjoy my ewe's milk cheeses...


8 feb 2008:Weight Loss on GTD so far (without trying): 4 kilos (about 8 lbs - half a stone)
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Henriette Bsec
Wednesday, January 4, 2006, 4:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Victoria
I think cow's milk is probably the least ideal of all the milks, unfortunately it's the one that is the most readily available in our culture.
Goat and sheep milk is much more digestable, and probably milked by ancient B's!


I think you are right!
It is just easier to get good quality cows milk here
I have never been a fan of goats cheese or milk but this chistmas my sis made some very nice soft goat cheese in olive oil with lemon peel and rosemary !
They were just soooooooo goood vey lemonly ( I don´t think you can sy this but )
BTW I am BACK
Been with out telephone almost a month- fine but with out www  SAD !


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