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A database of blood group correlations to common diseases



Total number of records: 145 Matching records: 1

Stroke (cerebro-vascular accident)


Description:A European study comparing 50 patients with stroke to the standard expected frequency of ABO blood types in the surrounding population showed that the frequency of the blood group A in the patients with stroke was 120% greater than would normally be expected. In blood type B the percentage was even higher (159% of expected rate of occurrence). O blood type patients were only 85% as likely to develop stroke when compared the percentage of O type blood in the surrounding population. The authors concluded that "The possibility of linkage between gene for these blood type antigens and a gene which determines risk for stroke cannot be excluded". (1)

A 1979 study of 220 stoke patients looked at the viscosity of their blood a few hours after the stroke event. About 80% of the patients had blood cells that easily aggregated (stuck together). What was especially interesting was the discovery by the researchers that the clotting of blood in patients with Blood Types A and B was due to fibrinogen, whereas in Blood Types O and AB they were caused by other clotting factors. (2)

The term 'stroke' has been largely applied to blood clots in the brain. However, bleeding or hemorrhaging is perhaps as common. Together, these are often referred to as 'cerebral vascular accidents, or CVAs. As we have seen, the generalized tendency for individuals who are Type A and Type AB is towards problems associated with blood clotting, whereas in Blood Types B and O, the problems appear to be more linked to excessive bleeding and poor clotting.

The was verified in several studies, the largest being performed on over 1460 stroke patients, and reported in the British medical journal, Lancet. In 329 cases, the cause of death was certified as cerebral thrombosis (brain clot). In the thrombosis cases, there was an excess of patients of Blood Types A and AB, and a deficiency of Blood Types O and B. In the 482 strokes which were the result of cranial bleeding, the reverse was true: there was a significantly higher occurrence of patients who were Blood Types O and B over those who were Blood Types A and AB. (3)

An older (1967) study showed a higher rate of Types B and O in a group of 150 Swedish patients who had suffered cerebral aneurysms (bleeding into the cranial cavity). This again points to the lower clotting abilities of Type O and Type B blood over Type A and Type AB.(4)

The distribution of the blood groups of the ABO system was examined in 159 children with various vegetovascular disorders. The results were compared with the data on the distribution of the same blood groups in local population. A statistically significant (P less than 0.001) prevalence of persons with Blood Type A(II) and a lesser number of persons with Blood Type O(I) was revealed among the patients. It is assumed that Blood Type A(II) is an unfavorable factor for children with vegetovascular disorders. An analogy is drawn with various diseases and cerebral circulation impairments in adults in whom a number of research authors considered Blood Type A(II) to be a risk factor. (4)

To investigate possible associations between ABO blood types and coagulability levels, fibrinolysis, total lipids, cholesterol, and triglycerides, the plasma and serum of 300 Rh-positive male blood donors were tested. Analysis of the laboratory data shows a lower coagulability in Blood Type O individuals. This result was obtained in coagulation tests specific for Factor VIII level. In addition, a higher sensitivity to the in vitro heparin anticoagulant effect in Blood Type O individuals was confirmed.(5)

The NN subtype of the MN system is associated with a decreased incidence of stroke, versus the MM subtype where the stroke risk is increased
The distribution of the blood groups of the ABO system was examined in 159 children with various vegetovascular disorders. The results were compared with the data on the distribution of the same blood groups in local population. A statistically significant (P less than 0.001) prevalence of persons with blood group A(II) and a lesser number of persons with blood group O(I) was revealed among the patients. It is assumed that the blood group A(II) is an unfavourable factor for children with vegetovascular disorders. An analogy is drawn with various diseases and cerebral circulation impairments in adults in whom a number of authors consider the blood group A(II) to be a risk factor. Xx.>
References:1. Sostaric V, Bozicevic D, Brinar V, Grbavac Z. Hereditary antigen characteristics of blood in ischemic cerebrovascular accident. Neurol Croat 1991;40(1):3-11

2. Ionescu DA, Ghitescu M, Marcu I, Xenakis A. Erythrocyte rheology in acute cerebral thrombosis. Effects of ABO blood groups. Blut 1979 Nov;39(5):351-7

3. Ionescu DA, Marcu I, Bicescu E. Cerebral thrombosis, cerebral haemorrhage, and ABO blood-groups. Lancet 1976 Feb 7;1(7954):278-80

4. Ismagilov MF, Petrova SE. [ABO blood group system and vegetative-vascular disorders in children]. Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr 1981;81(10):1487-1488

5. Colonia VJ, Roisenberg I Investigation of associations between ABO blood groups and coagulation, fibrinolysis, total lipids, cholesterol, and triglycerides. Hum Genet 1979 Apr 27;48(2):221-30

6. Strang RR. Age, sex, and ABO blood group distributions of 150 patients with cerebral arteriovenous aneurysms. J Med Genet. 1967 Mar;4(1):29-30.

7. Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr 1981;81(10):1487-1488 [ABO blood group system and vegetative-vascular disorders in children]. Ismagilov MF, Petrova SE





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