PATHBASE
A database of blood group correlations to common diseases



Total number of records: 145 Matching records: 1

Infectious disease, Smallpox


Description:The hypothesis is put forward that the low frequency of A and high frequency of O blood group genes in the Icelandic human population is the result of a selective disadvantage of A during severe smallpox epidemics. The hypothesis is supported by data from India in 1965-6, which show a marked selective effect of a smallpox epidemic against the phenotypes A and AB (Vogel & Chakravartti, 1971). The conclusion is drawn that the present-day ABO blood group gene frequencies of the Icelandic population should be used with reservation as markers in the study of the origin of the Icelanders. (1)

The effect of antigenic polymorphism of the ABO-system blood groups on the character of the vaccinal process after immunization against natural smallpox was investigated. The increased susceptibility of persons possessing A antigen to the harmful effect of smallpox vaccine virus is due to hereditary rather than to acquired factors. The leukocytes of peripheral blood of these persons showed a poorer binding capacity with respect to the smallpoxvaccine virus; they also exhibited a high rate of chromosomal aberration after vaccination, resulting to some extent from increased proliferative ability of the cells. (2)
References:1. Adalsteinsson S. Possible changes in the frequency of the human ABO blood groups in Iceland due to smallpox epidemics selection. Ann Hum Genet. 1985 Oct;49 ( Pt 4):275-81.

2.Sokhin AA, Lebedinskii AP, Frolov AK, Frolov VK, Sotnik AY, Lysakova VI. The mechanism of group differences in the character of the vaccinal process in immunization against natural smallpox. J Hyg Epidemiol Microbiol Immunol. 1977;21(3):335-40.

3.Kellermann G. Further studies on the ABO-typing of ancient bones. Humangenetik. 1972;14(3):232-6





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