PATHBASE
A database of blood group correlations to common diseases



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Arthritis, Rheumatoid


Description:In general, Blood Type A appears to get a more aggressive form of rheumatoid arthritis. Recent studies on the antibodies made against the joint tissue typically found in rheumatoid arthritis show that they differ from normal antibodies in a key fashion. Normal antibodies have the sugar galactose as the carbohydrate-side chain. Antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis appear to be somewhat defective. Instead of galactose, the carbohydrate found on the side-chain is n-acetyl glucosamine, the sugar for which wheat germ lectin is highly specific. Apparently, the adoption of a wheat-free diet appears to have some effect in mollifying the effect of the antibody.

This also points to the fact that the two sugars most commonly used in alternative medicine to treat arthritis, glucosamine and chondroitin (the so called 'Arthritis Cure') may, in fact, have lectin-blocking actions as the basis for their effectiveness. It is worth noting again that glucosamine binds wheat germ lectin very effectively, while chondroitin is merely the Blood Type A antigen in very long linkages (polymerized). In either case, it is very likely that both function as sacrificial molecules, reacting with lectins, preventing these same lectins from reacting with the inflamed tissue. In fact, the basis of the 'Arthritis Cure' may well be that it chemically mimics the effect of a low-lectin diet. The aberrant antibody in rheumatoid arthritis, galactose-free immunoglobulin, has also been shown to have a high degree of reactivity with the lectin found in the common lentil bean (Lens culinaris). It has been found that a very good experimental model of human rheumatoid arthritis can be produced in laboratory rabbits by injecting their joints with the lentil lectin.

Some studies confirm that people with rheumatoid arthritis tend to be more high-strung, and less emotionally hardy. When they have poor coping mechanisms for life's stressors, the disease progresses more rapidly. Considering all of the information we've gathered concerning stress and its affect on the body, and adding what we understand about Type As who are inherently high strung, those Type As with rheumatoid arthritis should incorporate daily relaxation techniques, as well as calming exercises, to ameliorate the negative effects of stress.

In this study we evaluated secretor status in patients with reactive arthritis. Previous evidence indicates that non-secretion of AB0 and Lewis blood group antigens to saliva and other secretions is associated with susceptibility to certain bacterial infections and certain diseases with suspected autoimmune etiology. Secretor status can be determined based on the Lewis phenotype. We studied AB0, Lewis and Rhesus blood groups of 54 patients with previous reactive arthritis, 26 of whom had uroarthritis and 28 of whom had arthritis after enteric infection. Furthermore, 25 patients with uncomplicated yersiniosis and 57 healthy controls were studied. We did not find any correlation between secretor status and reactive arthritis or gastroenteritis due to Yersinia. AB0 blood group antigen B appeared to be protective against uroarthritis.
Clinical and genetic studies were analyzed in 47 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who had upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopies. Fifty-three percent of patients with RA had peptic ulcers and/or erosions. Sixty percent of patients with ulcers and/or erosions had a history of peptic ulcer disease. Although a greater number of patients with ulcers and/or erosions was taking regular aspirin or indomethacin, comparable numbers of patients with abnormal and normal endoscopies were using nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Nineteen of the 25 patients (76%) with ulcers and/or erosions had type O blood. Patients with abnormal and normal endoscopies had similar frequencies of GI complaints and fecal blood loss. GI symptoms and occult fecal blood loss, therefore, are not prominent features of upper GI disease in RA. ABO screening may be helpful in determining which patients with RA are at risk for developing peptic ulcers and/or erosions. 2.>
References:1.Rheumatol Int 1992;12(3):103-105 ABO and Lewis blood groups in reactive arthritis. Tertti R, Jarvinen H, Lahesmaa R, Yli-Kerttula U, Toivanen A

2.J Rheumatol 1987 Aug;14(4):692-699 Clinical and genetic characteristics of upper gastrointestinal disease in rheumatoid arthritis. Semble EL, Turner RA, Wu WC





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2014-8-28: Current Date 13:23:17 GMT: Current Time


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