PATHBASE
A database of blood group correlations to common diseases



Total number of records: 145 Matching records: 1

Infectious disease, Influenza


Description:BLOOD TYPE A: Demonstrates an ability to generate a quick and substantial antibody response against influenza type A (H1N1), and even more so against type A (H3N2). The response against the influenza B virus is less strong. Overall, Blood Type A tends to get only the less virulent forms of the virus. If they become ill, they do so less severely than others.BLOOD TYPE B: Has the weakest defense against A (H3N2), and a slightly better defense against A (H1N1). The type A (H3N2) antigen can still be found in healthy Blood Type Bs as long as five months after their recovery from the flu. There may be no symptoms, but the virus has nevertheless been given a safe harbor. Blood Type B, however, has an extremely strong advantage against influenza B strains than any of the other blood types. The immune response happens much more quickly and persists far longer than that of the other blood types.

BLOOD TYPE AB: Has a relatively poor ability to generate antibodies against any of the influenza viruses. The flu is problematic every year for Type ABs, as they're pretty much defenseless against all of the influenza types.

TYPE O: Lower risk, but prone to more virulent strains.

ABH secretors are significantly over represented among patients with influenza viruses A and B (55/64, 86%; p less than 0.025), rhinoviruses (63/72, 88%; p less than 0.01), respiratory syncytial virus (97/109, 89%; p less than 0.0005), and echoviruses (44/44, p less than 0.0005). Why this increased risk appears in secretors has not been clearly established. (79)
References:1. Raza MW, Blackwell CC, Molyneaux P, et al. Association between secretor status and respiratory viral illness. BMJ 1991 Oct 5;303(6806):815-8





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2014-10-22: Current Date 6:35:29 GMT: Current Time


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